Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Game Over

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Charles510
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Post Post #0  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:02 pm

Here is a link to a web version of the game you can play on your own.

Don't Panic!
Here's the manual:
Spoiler:
Relax, because everything you need to know about playing THE
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY is contained in the pages of this manual.
In this story, you will be Arthur Dent, a rather ordinary earth creature
who gets swept up in a whirlwind of interstellar adventures almost beyond
comprehension. As the story begins, bulldozers are waiting to reduce your
house to rubble to make way for a motorway bypass. While you attempt to
deal with your problem, your rather strange friend Ford Prefect drops by to
tell you that the Earth is about to be demolished to make way for an
interstellar bypass! If you survive this double threat, you'll embark on a
series of inter-galactic misadventures even funnier than your worst
nightmares! And, because anything is possible in THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO
THE GALAXY, you may soon not even be sure of your own identity!

If you're experienced with Infocom's interactive fiction, you may
not feel like reading the entire manual. However, you should at least read
the appendices of important commands and recognized verbs. The sample
transcript will give you ideas for some of the weird things you can do in
HITCHHIKER'S.

A special note for people who have read the book THE HITCHHIKER'S
GUIDE TO THE GALAXY: Although the opening of the game is fairly similar to
the book, the story quickly diverges, with lots of new material and
different twists. Familiarity with the story may make a few of the early
puzzles easier, but if you rely too heavily on this previous knowledge, you
will certainly befuddle yourself.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

An Overview
What is interactive fiction?
Moving around
Turns and scoring

Tips for Novices
Nine useful pointers about interactive fiction

Communicating with HITCHHIKER'S
Basic sentences
Complex sentences
Talking to characters in the story
Vocabulary limitations

Starting and Stopping
Starting HITCHHIKER'S
"Booting up"
Saving and restoring
Quitting and restarting

Appendix A: Quick Reference Guide
This is a brief summary of the most important things to know about
interactive fiction. It is VITAL to know all these things before you begin
playing.

Appendix B: Important Commands
Appendix C: Some Recognized Verbs
Appendix D: HITCHHIKER'S Complaints
Appendix E: Sample Transcript and Map
Appendix F: We're Never Satisfied
Appendix G: If You Have Technical Problems
Appendix H: Author Biographies
Appendix I: Copyright and Warranty Information

An Overview

Interactive fiction is a story in which you are the main character. Your
own thinking and imagination determine the actions of that character and
guide the story from start to finish.

Each work of interactive fiction, such as HITCHHIKER'S, presents
you with a series of locations, items, characters, and events. You can
interact with these in a variety of ways.

To move from place to place, type the direction you want to go.
When you find yourself in a new location, it's a good idea to become
familiar with your surroundings by exploring the nearby rooms and reading
each description carefully. (You may notice that HITCHHIKER'S occasionally
refers to a location as a "room", even if you are outdoors.) As you
explore, it is helpful to make a map of the geography.

An important element of interactive fiction is puzzle-solving. You
should think of a locked door or a ferocious beast not as a permanent
obstacle, but merely as a puzzle to be tackled. Solving puzzles will
frequently involve bringing a certain item with you and then using it in
the proper way.

In HITCHHIKER'S, time passes only in response to your input. You
might imagine a clock that ticks once for each sentence you type, and the
story progresses only at each tick. Nothing happens until you type a
sentence and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key, so you can plan your turns as
slowly and carefully as you want.

To measure your progress, HITCHHIKER'S keeps track of your score.
You may get points for solving puzzles, performing certain actions, or
visiting certain locations. Keeping track of what actions increase your
score will help you learn what the goal of the story is.

Tips for Novices

1. Draw a map. It should include each location and the directions
connecting it to adjoining locations. When you find yourself in a new
location, make a note of any interesting objects there. (See the small
sample map that goes along with the sample transcript.) There are 10
possible directions plus IN and OUT.

2. Most objects that you can pick up are important for solving one or more
of the puzzles you'll run into in the story.

3. Save your place often. That way, if you mess up or get "killed," you
won't have to start over from the beginning.

4. Read the story carefully! There are often clues in the descriptions of
locations and objects, as well as in labels, engravings, books, and so on.
Even strange or dangerous actions may provide clues, and might prove to be
fun! You can always save your position first if you want. Here's a silly
example:

>GIVE THE TARNISHED COIN TO THE USHER
The user looks unimpressed, and begins leading you toward the last row of
the theatre.
You've just learned there is something (such as the crisp bill) which might
convince the usher to give you a front row seat...perhaps even a front row
seat next to Queen Isameera and her dreadfully expensive and easy-to-steal
diamond-studded tiara.

5. Unlike other "adventure games" you may have played, there are many
possible routes to the end of HITCHHIKER'S. Some puzzles have more than
one solution; other puzzles don't need to be solved at all. Sometimes you
will have to solve one puzzle in order to obtain the item(s) or information
you need to solve another puzzle.

6. You might find it helpful to go through HITCHHIKER'S with another
person. Different people may find different puzzles easy and can often
complement each other.

7. If you really get stuck, you can order a hint booklet and a complete map
using the order form in your package. You don't need this booklet to enjoy
the story, but it will make solving HITCHHIKER'S easier.

8. Read the sample transcript to get a feel for how Infocom's interactive
fiction works.

9. You can word a command in different ways. For example, if you were
tired, or wanted to climb between the sheets for some other reason, you can
type in any of the following:

>PUT ON THE GOWN
>WEAR THE TATTY DRESSING GOWN
>DON GOWN

In fact, if the gown is the only article of clothing present, just typing
WEAR is enough, since HITCHHIKER'S will assume you mean the gown. But more
about that in the next section.

Communicating with HITCHHIKER'S

In HITCHHIKER'S, you type your commands in plain English each time you see
the prompt (>). HITCHHIKER'S usually acts as if your commands begin with
"I want to...," although you shouldn't actually type those words. You can
use the words like THE if you want, and you can use capital letters if you
want; HITCHHIKER'S doesn't care either way.

When you have finished typing a sentence, press the RETURN (or
ENTER) key. HITCHHIKER'S will then respond, telling you whether your
request is possible at this point in the story, and what happened as a
result.

HITCHHIKER'S recognizes your words by their first six letters, and
all subsequent letters are ignored. Therefore BULLDOg, BULLDOgs,
BULLDOzer, and BULLDOckpokingham (a small town in Dockpokinghamshire) would
all be treated as the same word by HITCHHIKER'S.

To move around, just type the desired direction. You can use the
eight compass directions: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST, NORTHEAST, NORTHWEST,
SOUTHEAST, and SOUTHWEST. You can abbreviate these to N, S, E, W, NE, NW,
SE, and SW respectively. You can use UP (or U), and DOWN (or D). IN and
OUT will also work in certain places. On board a ship, you'll want to use
the directions PORT (or P), STARBOARD (of SB), FORE (or F), and AFT.

HITCHHIKER'S understands many different kinds of sentences. Here
are several examples. (Note that some of these objects do not actually
appear in HITCHHIKER'S.)

>WALK TO THE NORTH
>GO DOWN
>NE
>GO AFT
>U
>TAKE BOX
>PICK UP THE CARDBOARD BOX
>DROP IT
>PUSH THE BUTTON
>OPEN THE AIRLOCK DOOR
>EXAMINE THE PRESSURE SUIT
>LOOK UNDER THE TABLE
>ENJOY THE RHODODENDRON BUSH
>SHOOT THE BEAST WITH THE PEA SHOOTER
>ATTACK THE BUREAUCRAT WITH THE COURT ORDER
>PUT THE BANANA PEEL IN FRONT OF THE BEGGAR

You can use multiple objects with certain verbs if you separate
them by the word AND or by a comma. Some examples:

>TAKE PENCIL, PAPER, STAMP
>DROP THE MAP, THE FORK, AND THE THERMO-NUCLEAR WEAPON
>PUT THE EGGS AND THE BACON IN THE FRYING PAN
>GIVE THE SHINY PENNY AND THE TARNISHED PENNY TO THE MONKEY

The word ALL refers to every visible object except those inside
something else. If there were an apple on the ground and an orange inside
a cabinet, TAKE ALL would take the apple but not the orange.

>TAKE ALL
>TAKE ALL STAMPS
>TAKE ALL THE STAMPS EXCEPT THE RED STAMP
>TAKE ALL FROM THE DESK
>GIVE ALL BUT THE PENCIL TO THE ROBOT
>DROP ALL EXCEPT THE PEA SHOOTER

You can include several sentences on one input line if you separate
them by the word THEN or by a period. (Note that each sentence will still
count as a turn.) You don't need a period at the end of the input line.
For example, you could type all of the following at once, before pressing
the RETURN (or ENTER) key:

>EAST, TAKE THE GUN THEN PUT THE BULLET IN IT. SHOOT GERTRUDE

If HITCHHIKER'S doesn't understand one of the sentences on your input line,
or of something unusual happens, it will ignore the rest of your input line
(see "HITCHHIKER'S Complaints").

There are three kinds of questions that HITCHHIKER'S understands:
WHAT, WHERE and WHO. Here are examples that you can try in HITCHHIKER'S:

>WHAT IS ADVANCED TEA SUBSTITUTE?
>WHERE IS THE TOWEL>
>WHO IS ZAPHOD BEEBLEBROX?

You will meet other people and creatures in HITCHHIKER'S You can
"talk" to these beings by typing their name, then a comma, then whatever
you want to say to them. Here are some examples:

>BARTENDER, GIVE ME A BEER
>FORD, OPEN THE SATCHEL
>CAPTAIN, WHAT ABOUT THE METEOR HOLE?
>FRED, TAKE THE TOWEL THEN FOLLOW ME
>MARVIN, KILL THE ALIEN. ENTER THE CLOSET

Notice that in the last two examples, you are giving a person more than one
command on the same input line.

You can use quotation marks to answer a question or say something
"out loud," or type something on a keyboard. For example:

>SAY "HELLO"
>ANSWER "ZEKE FITZBERRY"
>TYPE "LOGOUT"

HITCHHIKER'S tries to guess what you really mean when you don't
give enough information. For example, if you say that you want to do
something, but not what you want to do it to or with, HITCHHIKER'S will
sometimes decide that there is only one possible object you could mean.
When it does so, it will tell you. For example:

>SHOOT THE DOGGIE
(with the ray gun)
The cute little doggie is incinerated.

or

>GIVE THE TOWEL
(to the hitchhiker)
The hitchhiker naturally already has a towel, but thanks you politely for
your offer.

If your sentence is ambiguous, HITCHHIKER'S will ask what you
really mean. You can answer most of these questions briefly by supplying
the missing information, rather than typing the entire input again. You
can do this only at the very next prompt. For example:

>CUT THE BREAD
What do you want to cut the bread with?

>THE KNIFE
The bread is stale to the point of being petrified.

or

>KILL THE FLY WITH THE AXE
Which axe do you mean, the teensy axe or the atomic-powered supersonic
planet-smashing axe?

>TEENSY
The fly expires.

HITCHHIKER'S uses many words in its descriptions that it will not
recognize in your sentences. For example, you might read, "Disgusting gobs
or yellow goo ooze out of the monster's elbows." However, if HITCHHIKER'S
doesn't recognize the words GOO or ELBOWS in your input, you can assume
that they are not important to your completion of the story, except to
provide you with a more vivid description of where you are or what is going
on. HITCHHIKER'S recognizes over 800 words, nearly all that you are likely
to use in your sentences. If HITCHHIKER'S doesn't know a word you
used, or any of its common synonyms, you are almost certainly trying
something that is not important in continuing the story.

Starting and Stopping

Starting the story: Now that you know what to expect when you venture into
HITCHHIKER'S, it's time for you to "boot" your disk. To load HITCHHIKER'S,
follow the instructions on the Reference Card in your package.

Following the copyright notice and the release number of the story,
you will see the opening message.

Here are a couple of quick exercises to help you get accustomed to
interacting with HITCHHIKER'S. Try typing the following next to the prompt
(>):

>TURN ON THE LIGHT

Then press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. HITCHHIKER'S will respond with:

Good start to the day. Pity it's going to be the worst one of your life.
The light is now on.

You will also now see the description of the Bedroom, the opening location
of the story. Try typing:

>TAKE THE TATTY DRESSING GOWN

After you press the RETURN (or ENTER) key, HITCHHIKER'S
will respond:

You can't reach it from the bed. The effort of reaching is almost too much
for you to stand.

Saving and restoring: It will probably take you many days to complete
HITCHHIKER'S. Using the SAVE feature, you can continue the story at a
later time without having to start over from the beginning, just as you can
place a bookmark in a book you are reading. SAVE puts a "snapshot" of your
place in the story onto another disk. You should also save your place
before (or after) trying something dangerous or tricky. That way, even if
you get lost or "killed" in the story, you can return to your saved
position.

To save your place in the story, type SAVE at the prompt (>), and
press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. Then follow the instructions for saving
and restoring on your Reference Card. Some computers require a blank disk,
initialized and formatted, or saves. Using a disk with data on it (not
counting other Leather Goddesses of Phobos saves) may result in the loss of
that data, depending on your computer. You can save your position as often
as you like by using additional blank disks.

You can restore a saved position any time you want. To do so, type
RESTORE at the prompt (>), and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. Then
follow the instructions on your Reference Card. You can then continue the
story from the point where you used the SAVE command. You can type LOOK
for a description of where you are.

Quitting and restarting: If you want to start over from the beginning,
type RESTART and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. (This is usually faster
than re-booting.) Just to make sure, HITCHHIKER'S will ask if you really
want to start over. If you do, type Y or YES and press the RETURN (or
ENTER) key.

If you want to stop entirely, type QUIT. Once again, HITCHHIKER'S
will ask if this is really what you want to do.

Remember when you RESTART or QUIT: if you want to be able to return
to your current position, you must first do a SAVE.

APPENDIX A
Quick Reference Guide

1. To start the story ("boot up"), see the separate Reference Card in your
HITCHHIKER'S package.

2. When you see the prompt (>) on your screen, HITCHHIKER'S is waiting
for your input. There are four kinds of sentences or commands that
HITCHHIKER'S understands:

A. Direction commands: to move from place to place, just type
the direction you want to go: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST,
NORTHEAST, NORTHWEST, SOUTHWEST, SOUTHEAST, UP, DOWN, IN or
OUT, P (or PORT), SB, F, AFT.

B. Actions: Just type whatever you want to do. Some
examples: READ THE BOOK or OPEN THE DOOR or LOOK THROUGH THE
WINDOW or GIVE THE BALL OT THE CAT. Once you're familiar with
simple commands, try the more complex ones described in
"Communicating with HITCHHIKER'S."

C. Commands given to other characters: To talk to characters
in the story, type their name, then a comma, then what you
want to say to them. For example: RALPH, GIVE ME THE WELDING
TORCH or YOUNG MAN, GO WEST.

D. Special one-word commands, such as INVENTORY or
DIAGNOSE:

A list of these appears in the "Special Commands" section.

3. Important! After typing your sentence or command, you must press the
RETURN (or ENTER) key before HITCHHIKER'S will respond.

4. On most computers, your screen will have a special line called the
status line. It tells you the name of your current location, your score,
and the number of turns you have taken so far in the story.

5. You can pick up and carry many of the items you'll find in the story.
For example, if you type TAKE THE SPOON, you will be carrying it. Type
INVENTORY to see a list of the items you are carrying.

6. When you want to stop, save your place for later, or start over, read
the "Starting and Stopping" section.

7. If you have trouble, refer to the specific section of the manual for
more detailed instructions.

APPENDIX B
Important Commands

There are a number of one-word commands which you can type instead of a
sentence. You can use them over and over as needed. Some count as a turn,
others do not. Type the command after the prompt (>) and press the RETURN
(or ENTER) key.

AGAIN - HITCHHIKER'S will usually respond as if you had repeated your
previous sentence. Among the cases where AGAIN will not work is if you
were just talking to another character. You can abbreviate AGAIN to G.

BRIEF - This command tells HITCHHIKER'S to give you the full description of
a location only the first time you enter it. On subsequent visits,
HITCHHIKER'S will tell you only the name of the location and the objects
present. This is how HITCHHIKER'S will normally act, unless you tell it
otherwise using the VERBOSE or SUPERBRIEF commands.

DIAGNOSE - HITCHHIKER'S will give you a brief medical report of your
physical condition.

FOOTNOTE - Occasionally, the text in HITCHHIKER'S will mention the
existence of a footnote. To read the footnote, simply type FOOTNOTE
followed by the appropriate footnote number (for example, FOOTNOTE 7).
This will not count as a turn.

INVENTORY - HITCHHIKER'S will list what you have You can abbreviate
INVENTORY to I.

LOOK - This tells HITCHHIKER'S to describe your location in full detail.
You can abbreviate LOOK to L.

QUIT - This lets you stop. If you want to save your position before
quitting, follow the instructions in the "Starting and Stopping" section.
You can abbreviate QUIT to Q.

RESTART - This stops the story and starts it over from the beginning.

RESTORE - This restores a saved position made using the SAVE command. See
"Starting and Stopping" for more details.

SAVE - This makes a "snapshot" of your current position onto your storage
disk. You can return to a saved position in the future using the RESTORE
command. See "Starting and Stopping" for more details.

SCORE - HITCHHIKER'S will show your current score and the number of turns
you have taken.

SCRIPT - This command tells your printer to begin making a transcript of
the story as you go along. A transcript may aid your memory but is not
necessary. It will work only on certain computers; read your Reference
Card for details.

SUPERBRIEF - This command tells HITCHHIKER'S to display only the name of a
place you have entered, even if you have never been there before. In this
mode, HITCHHIKER'S will not even mention which objects are present. Of
course, you can always get a description of your location and the items
there by typing LOOK. In SUPERBRIEF mode, the blank line between turns will
be eliminated. This mode is meant for players who are already know their
way around. Also see VERBOSE and BRIEF.

UNSCRIPT - This commands your printer to stop making a transcript.

VERBOSE - The VERBOSE command tells HITCHHIKER'S that you want a complete
description of each location, and the objects in it, every time you enter a
location, even if you've been there before. Also see BRIEF and SUPERBRIEF.
VERSION - HITCHHIKER'S responds by showing you the
release number and the serial number of your copy of the story. Please
include this information is you ever report a "bug".

WAIT - This will cause time in the story to pass. Normally, between turns,
nothing happens in the story. You could leave your computer, have a snack,
take a walk around the block, hitchhike to Procyon VII, spend fourteen
years working in the slime pits, and return to the story to find that
nothing has changed. You can use WAIT to make time pass in the story
without doing anything. For example, if you encounter an alien being, you
could WAIT to see what it will do. Or, if you are in a moving vehicle, you
could WAIT to see where it will go. You can abbreviate WAIT to Z.

APPENDIX C
Some Recognized Verbs

These are only some of the verbs that HITCHHIKER'S understands. There are
many more. Remember you can use a variety of prepositions with them. For
example, LOOK can become LOOK INSIDE, LOOK BEHIND, LOOK UNDER, LOOK
THROUGH, LOOK AT, and so on.

ANSWER ENJOY LIGHT SAY
APPROACH ENTER LISTEN SHOOT
ASK ESCAPE LOOK SHOW
BLOCK EXAMINE MOVE SIT
BUY EXIT PANIC SLEEP
CARVE FILL PULL SMELL
CLIMB FIND OPEN STAND
CLOSE FOLLOW PICK TAKE
CONNECT GIVE PLUG TASTE
CONSULT HANG POINT THROW
COVER HIDE PUSH TOUCH
DANGLE JUMP PUT TURN
DESTROY KILL READ TYPE
DRINK KNOCK RELAX WAKE
DROP LIE REMOVE WALK

APPENDIX D
HITCHHIKER'S Complaints

HITCHHIKER'S will complain if you type a command that confuses it
completely. HITCHHIKER'S will then ignore the rest of the input line.
(Certain events, such as being attacked or walking into a wall, may also
cause Leather Goddesses of Phobos to ignore the rest of your command, since
the event may have changed your situation drastically.) Some of
HITCHHIKER'S complaints:

I don't know the word "______________." The word you typed is not in the
story's vocabulary. Sometimes using a synonym or rephrasing will help. If
not, HITCHHIKER'S probably doesn't know the idea you were trying to get
across.

You used the word "__________" in a way that I don't understand.
HITCHHIKER'S knows the word you typed, but couldn't use it in that sense.
Usually this is because HITCHHIKER'S knows the word as a different
part of speech. For example, if you typed LOWER THE FLAG, you are using
LOWER as a verb, but HITCHHIKER'S might know LOWER only as an adjective, as
in LOWER THE BOOM.

That sentence isn't one I recognize. The sentence you typed may have been
gibberish, such as GIVE TROLL WITH SWORD. Or, you may have typed a
reasonable sentence but used a syntax that HITCHHIKER'S does not recognize,
such as SMELL UNDER THE ROCK. Try rephrasing the sentence.

There was no verb in that sentence! Unless you are answering a question,
each sentence must have a verb (or a command) in it somewhere.

There seems to be a noun missing in that sentence. This usually means your
sentence was incomplete, such as EAT THE BLUE.

There were too many nouns in that sentence. An example is PUT THE SOUP IN
THE BOWL WITH THE LADLE, which has three noun "phrases," one more than
HITCHHIKER'S can digest in a single action.

You can't use multiple (in)direct objects with __________. You can use
multiple objects (that is, nouns or noun phrases separated by AND or a
comma) or the word ALL only with certain verbs. Among the more useful of
these verbs are TAKE, DROP, and PUT. An example of a verb that will not
work with multiple objects is ATTACK; you say ATTACK ALL or ATTACK THE
ALIEN AND THE ROBOT>

You can't see any ___________ here! The object you referred to was not
accessible. It may be somewhere else, for instance, or present but in a
closed container.

The other object(s) that you mentioned isn't (aren't) here. You referred
to one or more objects in the same sentence, some of which aren't present
or accessible.

Be Specific: What do you want to ___________? You used HIM, HER,or IT, but
HITCHHIKER'S isn't sure what person or object you meant.

I beg your pardon? You pressed the RETURN (or ENTER) key without typing
anything.

It's too dark to see! In the story, there was not enough light to perform
your action.

You can't go that way. There is no passage or exit in the direction you
want to move.

APPENDIX E
Sample Transcript and Map

This transcript is not from HITCHHIKER'S, but it does show many of the
typical commands you might use in the story. it contains some simple
puzzles and their solutions, and it will give you a good idea of how
Infocom's interactive fiction works. The player's command appears in
capital letters after each prompt (>). The map represents the terrain in
the sample transcript as you might have drawn it.
Code: Select all
           

                                      Table
                                      Workbench
                  Hypodermic needle
                                 rock
      !---------!     !---------!     !------------!
      ! Outside !-----! Waiting !     !            !               
      ! Blood   !     ! Room    !-----! Laboratory !               
      ! Bank    !     !         !     !            !           
      !----!----!     !----|----!     !-----|------!             
           !Sign            Bench           To Taxi                     
           !Doorbell        Smelling       
           !                Salts               
           !                                     
           !                                                     
     !-----|----!                                       
     !          !                                   
     !Street    !                 
     !Corner    !
     !----|-----!
          ! From Taxi

>GET OUT OF THE TAXI
The door is locked
"Hey, that's four pounds thirty, old chap."
>GIVE THE FIVE POUND NOTE TO THE DRIVER
"Thanks, chum."
>UNLOCK THE DOOR
The taxi door is now unlocked.
>GET OUT OF THE TAXI
Street Corner
You are on a street corner on the outskirts of London. A signpost reveals
that you are on the corner of Foomingster and Frobbington. The sidewalk
continues north and east. Because of the heavy traffic here, crossing the
street is out of the question.
>WHO AM I?
You are Chester Smith, an unemployed granola salesman.
>WHAT IS THE OBJECT OF THE GAME?
Well, the superficial object of the game is to get to the end of the story
and achieve the maximum score.

The real object of the game is to show a bunch of novices how interactive
fiction works.
>WALK NORTH
Outside Blood Bank
You are in the middle of the block on a street that runs north-south.
Immediately to the east is the entrance to a massive granite (Footnote 9)
building. Next to the entrance is a sign and a doorbell.
>FOOTNOTE 9
Well, concrete actually. We wanted a granite building for the story, but
we couldn't afford it because constructing that giant spaceship for the
Aldebaran Battle scene took such a big bite our of the budget. But the
concrete IS covered with a plastic veneer that does LOOK a lot like
granite.
>READ THE SIGN
"OUTSKIRTS OF LONDON BLOOD BANK: We pay $30 for a pint of blood. Painless,
takes only an our. Ring doorbell for admittance.
>EAST
The Blood Bank door is closed.
>OPEN IT
It's locked
>RING THE DOORBELL
You already did that, didn't you?
>NO
I think you're wrong. I'm a computer, so I have a really terrific memory,
and I'm almost positive you already range the doorbell. Couldn't you be
mistaken?
>NO
Hmmm...well, I just looked back, and I guess you didn't ring the doorbell
after all. Do you still want to ring the doorbell?
>YES
The bell rings. A minute later, a stooped man opens the door and beckons
you to enter.
>ENTER THE BLOOD BANK
Waiting Room
This is a dim room with exits to the east and west. A narrow, winding
stair leads downward. The room is sparsely furnished with several
uncomfortable-looking benches. There is no one waiting ahead of you.
There is a bottle of smelling salts here.

The stooped man slams the front door and bolts it.
"Please...have a seat. It will only be several...minutes." He exits to
the east.
>SIT DOWN
What do you want to sit down on?
>THE BENCH
You are now sitting on the bench.
>ENJOY THE BENCH
Easier said than done, considering how hard and uncomfortable the bench is.
>TAKE THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING SALTS
You can't reach it from the bench.
>STAND UP
You are on your own feet again.
>TAKE THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING SALTS
Your load is too heavy
>INVENTORY
You have:
a briefcase
a suit
it looks like the suit contains:
a ten-pound note
a grapefruit
>OPEN THE BRIEFCASE
Opening the briefcase reveals an array of granola samples
>DROP THE GRAPEFRUIT THEN TAKE THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING SALTS
Dropped
Taken
>WAIT
After all, what's a waiting room for? Time passes... The stooped man
enters, pushing a wheelbarrow full of bones. You're no expert on the
subject, but they sure don't look like chicken bones. He spills the bones
down the winding stairway.
>WEST
The front door is closed
>OPEN THE DOOR
Which door do you mean, the front door or the laboratory door?
>FRONT
It's bolted
>LOOK
Waiting Room
This is a dim room with exits to the east and west. A narrow, winding
stair leads downward. The room is sparsely furnished with several
uncomfortable-looking benches.
There is no one waiting ahead of you.
There is a grapefruit here.
The stooped man is here, pushing a wheelbarrow.
>STOOPED MAN, OPEN THE FRONT DOOR
"Who are you calling stooped? I've got a name you know--Igor."
>IGOR, OPEN THE FRONT DOOR
Igor chuckles. "Don't be nervous. It's completely...painless. There's
nothing to worry about."
>IGOR, WHAT ABOUT THE BONES?
"Oh! Um, they're just...fake bones...we use for the ...anatomy class on
Wednesdays!"
A gaunt man emerges from the doorway to the east.
"Igor, bring in the next subject." He exits.
>BREAK DOWN THE STREET DOOR
This results in a very sore shoulder.
"If you'll just...step this way," says Igor, producing a cattle prod.
>DON'T WALK EAST
You bravely hold your ground. Igor pokes you with the prod. You feel less
brave.
>WALK EAST
Laboratory
This is an even dimmer room filled with strange apparatus. A person-sized
table fills the center of the room.
The mad scientist is here, rubbing his hands. Igor enters behind you and
locks the door.
>DON'T PANIC
You try your best. You fail.
"The table...please lie down...on the table," says Igor, fondling the prod.
>LIE DOWN ON THE TABLE
You are now lying on the table. The mad scientist quickly shackles your
wrists and ankles.
>MAD SCIENTIST, LET ME GO
"Who are you calling mad? They called me mad at Oxford also, but I'll show
them!" The mad scientist produces a hypodermic needle filled with a
bubbling green fluid. He slowly inserts the needle into your arm.
Everything becomes dark and fuzzy...
>LOOK
Everything is dark and fuzzy.
>NORTH
If you recall, you passed out a few moves ago.
>DIAGNOSE
If you recall, you passed out a few moves ago.
>LOOK ST ME
Everything is dark and fuzzy.
>WAIT
Time passes...
The fuzziness clears, and you find yourself in a strange new location.
>LOOK
West of House
You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded
front door. There is a small mailbox here.
>OPEN THE MAILBOX
Opening the small mailbox reveals a leaflet.
>INVENTORY
You have:
a briefcase
it looks like the briefcase contains:
an array of granola samples
a suit
It looks like the suit contains:
a ten-pound note
a bottle of smelling salts
>SMELL THE SMELLING SALTS
It smells just like the lid of a bottle of smelling salts.
>OPEN THE BOTTLE
Opened
>SMELL THE SMELLING SALTS
The smell is overpowering. Your surroundings blur and grow indistinct...
Laboratory
Sitting on the table are:
some bones
Sitting on your workbench is:
a hypodermic needle
a book
>IGOR, REMOVE THE BONES
"Yes, master." Igor clears the table. 'There's another subject waiting
outside."
>IGOR, BRING IN THE NEXT SUBJECT
"Yes, master."
>WHO AM I?
You are Baron von Edelstein, the "Mad Professor of Oxford."
>EXAMINE THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLE
It is filled with a bubbling green fluid, your identity transfer serum.
>READ THE BOOK
(taking the book first)
The book is entitled "Who's Who in Interactive Fiction Sample Transcripts."
It would take hours and hours to read the whole thing; perhaps you'd like
to consult the book about a specific individual?
>CONSULT THE BOOK ABOUT ME
The entry about Baron von Edelstein reads, "A minor and poorly developed
character in the HITCHHIKER'S sample transcript."
Igor prods the subject into the room and onto the table.
>INJECT SUBJECT WITH THE SERUM
You're not holding the hypodermic needle
>TAKE THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLE
Taken
>INJECT THE SUBJECT WITH THE SERUM
The subject, whom you forgot to shackle to the table, pushes you away. In
the ensuing struggle, you accidentally inject yourself with the serum.
Lights whirl around your head. Especially red, yellow, and green lights.
The lights slow down and finally stop whirling, and you realize that...
Your taxi is stopped at a traffic light. It's been an hour since your last
fare. Suddenly, someone pulls open the door and slides into the back seat.
"Corner of Frobbington and Foominster, please."
Last edited by Charles510 on Wed Apr 21, 2021 4:52 pm, edited 8 times in total.

mallowgeno
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Post Post #1  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:34 pm

Bedroom Score: 0 Turns: 0
THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY
Infocom interactive fiction - a science fiction story
Copyright (c) 1984 by Infocom, Inc. All rights reserved.
Release 59 / Serial number 851108

You wake up. The room is spinning very gently round your head. Or at least it would be if you could see it which you can't.

It is pitch black.

>

>Feel around the room
Last edited by Charles510 on Tue Oct 13, 2020 4:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post Post #2  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:41 pm

That sentence isn't one I recognise.

>feel room
Fiddling with the room has no desirable effect.

>

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Post Post #3  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:43 pm

>go back to sleep. It's too early for this shit.

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Post Post #4  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:46 pm

I don't know the word "back".

>sleep
You nod off and are wakened briefly a few hours later as your home is unexpectedly demolished to make way for a new bypass. You are seriously injured in the process, but on your way to the hospital a fleet of Vogon Constructor ships unexpectedly arrives and demolishes the Earth to make way for a new hyperspace bypass.

Next time, try turning on the light.

We are about to give you your score. Put on your peril-sensitive sunglasses now. (Hit RETURN or ENTER when ready.) >

Your score is 0 of a possible 400, in 1 turn.

Would you like to start over, restore a saved position, or end this session of the game?
(Type RESTART, RESTORE, or QUIT): >Restart

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Post Post #5  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:47 pm

THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY
Infocom interactive fiction - a science fiction story
Copyright (c) 1984 by Infocom, Inc. All rights reserved.
Release 59 / Serial number 851108

You wake up. The room is spinning very gently round your head. Or at least it would be if you could see it which you can't.

It is pitch black.

>

Elsa Jay
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Post Post #6  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:50 pm

Welp I tried and somehow got us killed turn 1. Up too the rest of you folks for now.

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Post Post #7  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:54 pm

>look
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #8  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:03 pm

It is pitch black.

>

Clemency
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Post Post #9  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:04 pm

>look
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #10  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:04 pm

It is pitch black.

>

Clemency
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Post Post #11  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:05 pm

>look
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #12  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:06 pm

It is pitch black.

>

Clemency
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Post Post #13  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:06 pm

>look
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #14  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:06 pm

> Send Clemency to an insane asylum

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Post Post #15  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:07 pm

It is pitch black.

>

Charles510
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Post Post #16  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:07 pm

I don't know the word "send".

>

Elsa Jay
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Post Post #17  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:08 pm

> kill Clemency

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Post Post #18  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:09 pm

I don't know the word "clemency".

>

Clemency
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Post Post #19  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:09 pm


>look
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #20  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:10 pm

It is pitch black.

>

Elsa Jay
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Post Post #21  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:10 pm

> Enter new data

Clemency, verb.
mercy; lenience.
"an appeal for clemency"

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Post Post #22  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:11 pm

>leave
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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Post Post #23  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:12 pm

I don't know the word "data".

>leave
You'll have to get out of the bed first.

>

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Post Post #24  (ISO)  » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:13 pm

>die
"all due respect, the words "Clemency" and "normal" do not belong in the same paragraph" - the worst

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