I would love to discuss food

This forum is for discussion about anything else.
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Post Post #8  (isolation #0)  » Sun Aug 15, 2010 12:16 pm

Another way to mix up the pork sandwich is with an Asian slaw. That would be nice.

Also depending on how elaborate you cooking is, you could use the pork to stuff Chinese steamed buns. You might need to cut the BBQ sauce with a little Hoisin sauce, but I think it could work. Steamed bread dough is really easy to make. Just flour, yeast and either milk or water with sugar and salt to taste. The time consuming part is the shaping and steaming. But they can be made ahead of time and reheat really well in a microwave wrapped in plastic.

I can also vouch for BBQ pork casserole. I used to cook it in college with macaroni, and American cheese with diced pork and BBQ sauce. Throw in sauted onions, peppers, mushrooms as you have them and it starts to come out more like a cheese steak casserole.

Good thing to do with fish is a Thai seafood curry. If you can get coconut milk on the cheap the only other ingredient you really need is Thai curry paste with is concentrated enough it goes a really long way. Toss in whatever vegetables you can get (peppers, eggplant, squash, bamboo shoots, watercress, onions, squash, zucchini, nappa cabbage etc.)

Something I like to do with any leftovers at home is fried rice. Works well with any protein or veggies and you can get really different flavors depending on what you add. My favorite is bacon asparagus. But fish works well, chicken pork anything is good. Seafood is seasoned nicely with Mirin if you can get any of that for cheap, cooking sherry or chinese cooking wine works good for heavier meats. Just make sure you add enough salt and sugar to it when youre finishing it off. If it doesnt taste good just keep adding sugar. If its too sweet balance it with salt/soy sauce. And don't skimp on the eggs. Fried rice is always better with eggs.

EDIT: Also if you ever have a large amount of fatty pork (shoulder, rump, belly etc) and need a new stew recipe I've got a really simple one that most people like. It's good with fried tofu cubes as well.
Last edited by shaft.ed on Sun Aug 15, 2010 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post Post #25  (isolation #1)  » Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:14 am

Nuwen wrote:the local culture of my city has sort of embraced grocery store sushi, but only because the wegman's chains employ lower tier sushi chefs. it's called "wushi."

http://rocwiki.org/Local_Slang
Comparing it to the restaurant sushi of Rochester (at least the places I've tried), it can't get much worse. There's only so low you can go. And the Wegman's actually isn't too bad for grocery sushi. I had some in Florida when I was in college. As I was eating it I noticed the label "packaged in Iowa." That was deeply disturbing.

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Post Post #28  (isolation #2)  » Mon Aug 16, 2010 3:45 am

scallop is my favorite. I can eat a whole meal of just scallop nigiri.

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Post Post #32  (isolation #3)  » Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:44 am

I make fish fried rice all the time. Works well. Just stay away from "fishy" fish. Salmon is best, but whitefish can also work. Wouldn't do it with canned tuna or anything like that. Seasoning with mirin (sake cut with sugar water) helps cut the fishiness and adds a nice sweet undertone.

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Post Post #40  (isolation #4)  » Tue Aug 17, 2010 1:48 pm

Since I really enjoy JDodge belittling me without actually reading my post, I figured I'd offer another suggestion for pork.

Something I really like to do with pork is to spread it on a baking pan and cover it with paper thin slices of peaches and onions. For the simple version toss the slices with brown sugar and a pinch of salt. If you want more complicated you can toss them in satay sauce. I usually add garlic, but that tends to create gas with age.

If your pork is already cooked, you can just bake it until the onions are carmelized. The peaches should pretty much melt away during the baking. I've never tried this with already cooked pork, however so I'm not sure how it would turn out. But I usually cook the pork through on a lower heat, and then cook off the peaches under the broiler.

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Post Post #54  (isolation #5)  » Wed Aug 18, 2010 4:28 am

I've tried fish fried rice with talapia, sole and cod. Talapia definitely works best and I would recommend using it if you did want to try fish fried rice. Sole may also be doable, but I wouldn't go with cod. May have just been a poor quality product but the couple times I've tried cod it just wasnt good.

I don't know how well you're residents would handle chewing it, but udon might be something else to do with the fish. In Seattle at least, bulk dashi powder was quite cheap and that's about all you need for the broth. Don't know about the cost of udon noodles, but they can be made in house depending on the amount of time you have. I would fry the fish if you can. Just dust it with all purpose flour mixed with potato flour and it comes out with a nice texture and flavor.

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Post Post #59  (isolation #6)  » Thu Aug 19, 2010 7:50 am

Square fish fillets would be perfect for udon. I would be surprised if the Japanese hadn't already developed square fish. But you'd probably want a deep fryer since pan frying appears to be out of the question.

Re favorite foods: There used to a be a pictoral thread where scummers listed their favorite dishes. But I can't find it right now. Might have gotten lost in the move.

Also isn't it peak blackberry season up in the Northwest right now? Anything you could do with that?

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Post Post #61  (isolation #7)  » Thu Aug 19, 2010 9:41 am

JD, yeah that's the one for stuff we've cooked. There was an older thread for things we liked to eat. I think it hasn't been posted in for quite some time and the GD only goes back to 2009 right now, so I have a feeling it is in the archives? (if they exist for the GD).

The only thing i've seen for mint jelly besides large chunks of meat was jalepeno mint jelly paired with cheese and crackers. Also as a dessert topping.
It seems like you could invent some mint jelly/pulled pork sandwich killing two birds with one stone. For some reason I think a large amount of carmelized onions/garlic would help bring it together. A pan at highish heat to scorch the jelly into the pork instead of using it as a sauce? If you wanted to go really crazy add a slice of cold sharp cheddar perhaps on the side for the less adventurous. Might be a good idea to try this before serving to other people :shifty:

Another fish note. I don't know what you usually pair your fish fillets with, but my grandparents have always loved flounder with stewed tomatos and baked macaroni and cheese. That meal was always a big event growing up, and the consistency would go well with the dental needs of old folks.

The fish sauce sounds like you might have too many things going on. I'm probably just a bad cook, but whenever I get past about 4 or 5 ingredients it just ends up tasting like brown.

EDIT: Found the old food thread. Not as extensive as I remembered.

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Post Post #75  (isolation #8)  » Fri Aug 20, 2010 5:21 am

My parents always make pork and sauerkraut with spetzles for new years dinner. I don't eat sauerkraut at all, but the pork is delicious and its really easy to make. Just brown a pork roast (i like fatty ones, mom gets loin) dump in a bag of sauerkraut and add in a chopped medium onion and apple for flavor and sweetness. I found a spetzle recipe I like better than my Mom's but I made the mistake of telling her about it.

My favorite easy thing to cook is my red pork stew. It's simply 3 parts sugar, 3 parts Soy Sauce, 2 parts Chinese cooking wine, 1 part black vinegar (use balsamic), 1 part ketchup, 1 part water. Just make enough of that to cover your pork and let it go. i usually use country cut ribs, but proper ribs come out the best. It's the best on the second day, and I usually add a handful of zucchini or yellow squash while reheating. Steamed bread dips really well into it. And fried tofu cubes are nice as they soak up the broth.

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Post Post #80  (isolation #9)  » Fri Aug 20, 2010 2:50 pm

It's similar to sherry, just less sweet and more alcoholic tasting. It's decent for steamed fish with ginger and soy sauce, but I still think mirin is one of the best and simplest ways to season fish.

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Post Post #88  (isolation #10)  » Sat Aug 21, 2010 2:07 am

Haschel Cedricson wrote:
Haschel Cedricson wrote:Guess who's making pretzels from scratch today?

I'll give you a hint: It's me.


Update: They are delicious. All of you should go make some now.
Living in Germany means never having to worry about finding delicious fresh made pretzels.

But congratulations, looks like a lot of work.

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Post Post #97  (isolation #11)  » Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:14 am

Xine wrote:
shaft.ed wrote:My parents always make pork and sauerkraut with spetzles for new years dinner. I don't eat sauerkraut at all, but the pork is delicious and its really easy to make. Just brown a pork roast (i like fatty ones, mom gets loin) dump in a bag of sauerkraut and add in a chopped medium onion and apple for flavor and sweetness. I found a spetzle recipe I like better than my Mom's but I made the mistake of telling her about it.

My favorite easy thing to cook is my red pork stew. It's simply 3 parts sugar, 3 parts Soy Sauce, 2 parts Chinese cooking wine, 1 part black vinegar (use balsamic), 1 part ketchup, 1 part water. Just make enough of that to cover your pork and let it go. i usually use country cut ribs, but proper ribs come out the best. It's the best on the second day, and I usually add a handful of zucchini or yellow squash while reheating. Steamed bread dips really well into it. And fried tofu cubes are nice as they soak up the broth.


would you ever serve this with rice, or noodles?
I always eat it with Jasmine rice. But if all you have is Uncle Ben's type rice, some noodle would probably work better.


Can you call it Lasagna Blanco or something like that?


Bok Choy
Green Onion
Eggplant
Squash/Pumpkin
Peanuts
Fresh Ginger
^Great stirfry ingredients^

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Post Post #99  (isolation #12)  » Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:22 am

Xine, I don't know if you tried out the pork stew recipe yet, but I wanted to add a disclaimer. I made it the first time with some new cookware I got here in Munich and it came out horrible. The pork had turned into little hockey pucks. I guess my previous pots where able to recondense the steam that came off the stew, but my new pots just let the water boil off. Being that it starts with a ton of sugar and salt in it, doesn't take a whole lot to start pulling moisture out of the pork. Anyway, just wanted to say if you notice the fluid level dropping much, just add water back in. I did that after the second reheat and the pork got soft again. Not as good as usual, but at least it was like eating rawhide doggie treats soaked in brine.

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Post Post #103  (isolation #13)  » Mon Sep 13, 2010 6:19 pm

I've never tried it, but I think honey would be a better substitute. TBH, you could probably cut back on the sugar and the soy/sauce salt and water down the broth a bit. Or up the cooking wine.

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Post Post #136  (isolation #14)  » Sun Oct 03, 2010 7:04 am

you can make scrambled eggs without cooking oil, you'll just lose a little bit to the pan.

Heat the pan, crack the eggss into the pan, mix it about with a fork, flip a couple times so wet surfaces become dry, once there is no more liquid eat it. To get really fancy put it on your bread and you have a sandwich

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Post Post #150  (isolation #15)  » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:23 pm

sirdanilot wrote:
bv310 wrote:You could also poach the egg, which involves the same boiling water, then crack the egg into it and cook it that way. Not my favourite way to eat an egg, but still pretty good.


The problem with that is, that it doesn't work. It simply doesn't. When I try it, the egg immediately falls apart and all the water goes cloudy.
Add some salt, or maybe even beer and you've got eggdrop soup.
...
PROFIT!!

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Post Post #152  (isolation #16)  » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:39 pm

yeah you could melt smoked cheddar on anything, and I'd probably eat it.

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Post Post #154  (isolation #17)  » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:43 pm

That didn't quite come out how I meant it. Just trying to say how wonderful melting cheese on something is

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Post Post #158  (isolation #18)  » Sun Oct 03, 2010 4:07 pm

Sudo_Nym wrote:
Xine wrote:Sudo: Naked cooking lessons will cost signifigantly more


What if I let you borrow Dominion for two weeks?
you should put that up on Craigslist, you could probably get more

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Post Post #186  (isolation #19)  » Sun Oct 10, 2010 3:05 am

TheButtonmen wrote:Is happy for you.


I never eat beets because I've only encountered them pickeled, but apparently they are supposed to be tasty as a raw component of a salad. I think in this form they are refered to as beetroot to distinguish from the pickeled beets, but I dont know.

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Post Post #194  (isolation #20)  » Mon Oct 18, 2010 12:00 pm

depends on their size but I buy zucchini all the time because I'm a cheap bastard. If they are small/averaged size that's about normal. If they are humongous, then you got a good deal. Don't remember off the top of my head but 1 - 1.5 Euro/kg sounds about average. And I'm in what is reported to be the most expensive food city in Germany.

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Post Post #198  (isolation #21)  » Tue Oct 19, 2010 10:10 am

I've tried cucumber in stir fry but the flavor never goes with my sauce and I've tried many kinds. How do you season your cucumber stir fries?

It might also be my expectations of a cucumber. I think of it as something cool and refreshing. When the cool part is removed I always seem to lose the refreshing.

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Post Post #200  (isolation #22)  » Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:10 pm

I tried a Thai sweet chilli sauce. Didn't work too well. And yeah it wasn't the main ingredient. Just a minor vegetable

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Post Post #208  (isolation #23)  » Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:40 am

Oman wrote:I'll pay you back, like mow the lawn or something.

You forgot the quote fingers

Xine, what kind of cuisine? (not that I"m qualified to design a menu or anything)


@sirdan...no thx

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Post Post #220  (isolation #24)  » Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:39 am

Ythill wrote:
Xine wrote:I may have a new work project for disussion soon. It was hinted today that I will be invited to help design the menu for a new location my company may be opening soon.

She's too humble to brag about where, so I'll do it for her... in the Portland Art Museum. What a gig!

Awesome!

Is it a full dining restaurant, or like a cafe with mostly sandwiches, soups and salads?

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Post Post #238  (isolation #25)  » Sun Oct 24, 2010 9:54 am

Deep fried potato is one of the most unhealthy things you can eat no matter what you do to it.

On the topic of paninis

Bacon
Roast Red Pepper
Carmelized Shallots
Fresh Cheese (I've only seen this in Germany so I don't know the English name, only the German to English translation, it's a smooth slightly sweet creamy cheese)

Yeah I know really imaginative

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Post Post #243  (isolation #26)  » Sun Oct 24, 2010 10:53 am

what about

Roast chicken thigh skin on
Honey BBQ sauce
Raw onion
roma tomato
lettuce

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Post Post #251  (isolation #27)  » Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:03 pm

leave Vegemite to experiments. It is vile

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Post Post #279  (isolation #28)  » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:02 am

Oman wrote:I'm bringing vegemite to the US with me, Xinedog.
This will drastically decrease your chances of getting laid

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Post Post #305  (isolation #29)  » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:51 am

Alton Brown did a Good Eats episode on the science behind aioli and other similar sauces, but I've forgotten most of it as I saw it many years ago. I only remember that mustard is really important because it is amphipathic and helps keep the whole thing from separating out into oil and water.

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Post Post #315  (isolation #30)  » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:18 am

Xine wrote:my reasearch did tell me that a traditional Aioli does not have eggs, what I am making is most likely Mayonayse, however, it is so common to call house made mayo, "aioli" that I only just found out the difference... after 10 years as a cook. So rather then debate semantics, I will let you know that my current working hypothosis is that I need more eggs, even though my recipie says otherwise
I have come across a tip saying if it splits you don't have to start over. Wisk eggs yolks as in the begining and then slowly dribble in your split aioli as you previously did with the oil.

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Post Post #322  (isolation #31)  » Tue Nov 02, 2010 4:01 pm

It would probably make a nice Krautsalat, but that's essentially just not creamy coleslaw.

Homemade sauerkraut?

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Post Post #356  (isolation #32)  » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:45 am

I thought pasties were used to cover up nipples?

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Post Post #371  (isolation #33)  » Tue Nov 30, 2010 8:33 pm

thats just like my college Comp Neuro class. Except replace squid with lobster, and crying children with happy neuroscientists.

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Post Post #373  (isolation #34)  » Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:05 pm

you forgot the quote fingers

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Post Post #392  (isolation #35)  » Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:18 am

I can'tmake pies cause I dont have an oven :?

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Post Post #395  (isolation #36)  » Sun Feb 13, 2011 1:17 pm

Xine, I don't know if you're still doing the panini planning but I've been eating a lot of Doener Kebab recently, and I don't think I've ever seen these in the US.
Image
Image

It's pretty much a gyro, but instead of being served on a pita, they take a big fluffy roll and press the hell out of it on a sandwich press. This makes for a really dense and crispy bread, that when made right does wonders for taste, texture and filling up your stomach.

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Post Post #403  (isolation #37)  » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:44 pm

Korts wrote:My favorite kebab shop also sells weed. My favorite weed dealer also sells kebab.

that, my friends, is a true entrepreneur

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Post Post #407  (isolation #38)  » Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:43 pm

I really miss good seafood. Bavaria and oceans don't really go hand in hand

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Post Post #412  (isolation #39)  » Mon Mar 14, 2011 12:24 pm

go for no bake?

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Post Post #423  (isolation #40)  » Wed Mar 16, 2011 3:22 am

bv310 wrote:Sudo, I can't fathom a way in which you could literally cause eggs to combust, but I am fascinated to hear this story.

This. I dont think i could get eggs on fire if I tried. That could make a good band name though.

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Post Post #428  (isolation #41)  » Wed Mar 16, 2011 3:37 pm

Knight of Cydonia wrote:So normally when I make chilli, I take the mince and mix it with an OXO beef stock cube, some rosemary, chilli flakes, crushed garlic and tomato puree before I brown it off, then add the sauce... except this time I accidentally poured a load of store-bought Szechuan sauce over the beef... it's actually quite nice, spicy and sweet. I added some soy sauce and star anise after I realised what I did... works. Just about.

add a cinnamon stick and some chinese cooking wine/sherry and that should round it off

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Post Post #436  (isolation #42)  » Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:51 am

BrutalAztecs wrote:and also read the comments to learn any suggested deviations, just browse with a bit of common sense and you're good.

I don't see how "182 people don't like eggs" is going to help anything

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Post Post #446  (isolation #43)  » Wed Apr 06, 2011 5:42 am

I'm not a big fan of most Korean foods. Had a fellow grad student that was Korean in my thesis lab and he'd go back to Korea once a year. While there he bought food for an entire year to eat off of (not all meals obv). Man that stuff has a shelflife

In other news, the local ice cream shops are all open again.
<excited

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Post Post #447  (isolation #44)  » Wed Apr 06, 2011 2:00 pm

:D Got my first ice cream of the year today. Chocolate Ginger with a sample of Hazelnut. So good.
Unfortunately the price is up 10 cents.

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Post Post #451  (isolation #45)  » Thu Apr 07, 2011 5:42 am

Reminds me of one of my favorite fried rices to make, asparagus with bacon. Good amount of Mirin/chinese cooking wine works really well with it.

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Post Post #457  (isolation #46)  » Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:27 pm

OK so I need some ideas on BBQ.

I've decided that one of the things I miss eating the most here in Bavaria is BBQ. I broke down today and went to the American section of my grocery store today and got some nice thick BBQ sauce that I like and a pack of chicken quarters, but I don't have any way to cook BBQ. I've got no grill and no oven, just a stove top. Does anyone have ideas as to how to simulate BBQ without such equipment. My first try didn't go so well. I tried a quick blanching of the chicken thigh in a broth and then put that in a fry pan on high heat to finish it and get some charring going on. But the flavors just didn't get into it, or coat it very well. Is something like a pulled pork the closest I'm going to be able to get?

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Post Post #459  (isolation #47)  » Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:45 pm

Ythill wrote:Buy a hibachi. They're not very expensive.

Yeah i dont have anywhere to hibachi. Not allowed to grill on my balcony. And I'm never home for dinner before sundown

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Post Post #465  (isolation #48)  » Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:25 am

Don't know if this is going to work. Making pineapple and Schinkenknacker fried rice today. Wish me luck.

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Post Post #467  (isolation #49)  » Sat Apr 16, 2011 2:45 pm

Thanks, the flavors worked out pretty good together. The only weird bit was the egg and the pineapple. I also wanted to use a different sausage with some heat in it, but the grocery stores here have a rotating stock of meats and cheeses. Still not used to that.

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Post Post #469  (isolation #50)  » Sat Apr 16, 2011 4:15 pm

Yeah, the quality seems better than average US grocers. I just forget sometimes that what I want to cook with might not be there. It also appears to be the same rotating stock across all grocers, which is weird. One time I wanted to make pork ribs, but I couldn't find them except at the butchers. I went to at least four different grocery stores looking for ribs. Took at least a week or more until they were stocked. There's also a cheese I really like, but they only have it about 1 week each month. I guess that's good because it keeps me from getting tired of it.

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Post Post #473  (isolation #51)  » Sat Apr 16, 2011 5:28 pm

@JD, I never even thought about supply chains effecting things like meat and cheeses. Don't know why. For produce its obvious. Everyone usually has the same stuff on sale. Which reminds me how happy I am that Munich is currently drowning in beautiful strawberries. Got a pound for a Euro this week.

@RC, I'm not sure what kind of cheese it is actually. They sell it as a wedge chopped off of the wheel so the whole label isnt there. And I haven't tried matching it up with the price tag on the shelf. It's a somewhat creamy smoked cheese. The smokiness reminds me of bacon back in the US, which I haven't been able to find here. That's the main reason I like it because it tastes like someone wrapped it in a nice smokey bacon for a week or so.

<not a fan of blue cheese or mushrooms

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Post Post #476  (isolation #52)  » Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:26 pm

Yeah the bacon that I find here that would be treated similar to how it is in the US is either a block, cut into cubes, or cut paper thin. None of these cooks down comparably to what I like in my bacon. It might just be a regional thing, or the fact that groceries have a more limited stock in the city though.

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Post Post #479  (isolation #53)  » Mon Apr 18, 2011 3:31 pm

bacon


Or lots of herbs, fresh basil is always good. Just keep it simple. Quality tomatoes + fresh herbs is better than any pasta with special ingredients I've ever had

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Post Post #495  (isolation #54)  » Tue Apr 26, 2011 2:22 am

I love rosemary with scallops. At my parents where they have a rosemary jungle in the front yard, we skewer them with rosemary and cook them on the grill.

Also, my go to for just about any frozen seafood is soy sauce and mirin. It's a bit stronger so you lose the natural flavors, but on frozen that's already been lost. Add ginger, green onion, sugar to taste. Cook just about anyway you like (grill, pan fry, steam, bake).

But my favorite way to eat scallops is just raw. They are so sweet if you don't cook them

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Post Post #497  (isolation #55)  » Tue Apr 26, 2011 6:19 am

um...you could always use plain butter and add garlic

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Post Post #502  (isolation #56)  » Tue Apr 26, 2011 8:57 am

springlullaby wrote:Here arise the question, how do I bake stuff without an oven?

Hah, I'm in the same predicament. And I haven't got a solution for you. Have you thought of steamed carrot cake? Then to get a bit of a baked quality crisp up the edges in a fry pan.
You could theoretically get a big pot, and some sort of metal stand for a smaller pot. But I find stovetops are pretty tough to regulate the temperature accurately.

Also is stuff still cheap in China? My father in law is on his yearly trip and he said a single peach was 60RMB in Shanghai.

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Post Post #512  (isolation #57)  » Thu May 05, 2011 12:04 pm

So I felt like pasta with a white wine reduction last night, but I never have wine. I ended up using mirin to deglaze my saute pan, and somehow it worked. Tasted nothing like what I wanted to eat, but it was at least edible

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Post Post #525  (isolation #58)  » Sun May 08, 2011 3:39 am

springlullaby wrote:And yeah, prices are on the rise in China compared to the last two years (taxi fares went up twice just this year), especially for middle to high end and imported goods but base products price is nowhere near US/Europe standards yet: my colleagues generally spend 10RMB on lunch, standard price for an hair cut is 15 rmb. I think your father in law either a)went to an ultra posh store selling so called high end goods to a new rich clientele b)was obviously a "laowai" and got friendly fouled by a street merchant, happens a lot in touristic areas. Just today a guy tried to make me pay 30rmb for a pack of cigarette which normally sell betzeen 8 and 10 rmb.
My father in law is a Shanghai native. He goes back every year for about a month (and he's really cheap so not shopping in high end places). But the hair cut and lunch have definitely gone up. I guess I last went about 8 years ago, my wife got her hair cut for 5RMB and lunch was about 6. Also Shanghai is usually more expensive than Beijing. I still don't get the peaches. I thought maybe it had to do with the disappearing bees. I know the pear trees have to be hand pollinated now.

Glad to hear its still reasonably cheaper. The exchange rate (for the dollar at least) has also dropped, so it's not quite the bargain vacation spot it used to be.

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Post Post #527  (isolation #59)  » Mon May 09, 2011 7:38 am

springlullaby wrote:Yes, I fondly remember a time were you could get your hair "dry washed" for 4 yuan, price including a 45 minutes massage. :)

hah, thats exactly what my wife would do. But i think she paid 5 for an hour

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Post Post #530  (isolation #60)  » Sat Jul 16, 2011 8:32 am

Xine wrote:I love figs!!!! isn't it early for figs? where do you live Papa?

me too, but I have no idea how to handle them
Any advice?

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Post Post #534  (isolation #61)  » Thu Jul 21, 2011 2:28 am

woot!

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Post Post #535  (isolation #62)  » Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:06 am

oh and you should definitely apply for Hell's Kitchen now

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Post Post #539  (isolation #63)  » Mon Jul 25, 2011 2:10 am

Never made risotto, but it's constantly on the cooking shows I watch. The keys from what I understand are to have the stock and the rice at the same temperature. Constantly stirring the rice without breaking it. And just keep ladeling in stock and letting it evaporate until the rice is cooked through. You'll want to have a good stock to start with obv.

You dont really have to make garlic butter. If you roast the garlic well it will turn into a spread on its own. Just spread the roasted garlic on the bread by itself. Butter is optional to add from there.

If you're using asparagus in your pasta, remember the bacon! Cooking asparagus in bacon fat is lovely. And apparently you're better off cooking asparagus in fats than through water based methods.

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Post Post #545  (isolation #64)  » Mon Jul 25, 2011 2:25 pm

How about a citrus dressing?

If you need another topping a smoothe goats cheese would make sense. But it seems pretty complete to me on toppings. I guess if you went citrus you could use orange segments or kumkwats

Also, I don't know how feasible it would be for a commercial kitchen, but chicken/duck skin crackling makes a great salad topping. Also a wonderful garnish for creamy pasta or fried rice. I just chop it into thick slivers. Could substitute it for the bacon

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Post Post #548  (isolation #65)  » Tue Jul 26, 2011 2:27 am

God, I love a good grilled cheese.

My favorite bread is pumpernickle/rye swirl. There's a cheese you can get in Philly called Cooper Sharp. It's kind of like a cross between a sharp cheddar and American cheese. I like that with tomatos and some crisp bacon

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Post Post #550  (isolation #66)  » Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:11 am

I just discovered the joys of deglazing the pan with tomatoes

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Post Post #552  (isolation #67)  » Thu Jul 28, 2011 2:06 am

um...eggs arent dairy

sorry no tips, dont cook with dairy much

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Post Post #560  (isolation #68)  » Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:36 am

just recently discovered cooking pineapple can make even the crappiest most sour fruit form the supermarket taste nice and sweet.
don't know why i couldnt figure this out earlier

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Post Post #564  (isolation #69)  » Thu Sep 15, 2011 3:30 am

Can someone please tell me about figs,
theyre back for the fall and I'd like to play with them

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Post Post #571  (isolation #70)  » Fri Sep 16, 2011 6:50 am

switch out Italian dressing with Balsamic and you've won

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Post Post #576  (isolation #71)  » Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:00 pm

yeah the difference in cuisine from crossing a single border is pretty striking

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Post Post #581  (isolation #72)  » Sat Sep 17, 2011 2:34 am

In post 579, Miyu wrote:Well I'm NW, so NE style doesn't apply. I'm also vegetarian, so salt pork was and is not an option. I had glanced at a couple of other recipes that were pretty decently rated and they didn't have a salty element, let alone include some sort of meat product in the process. So, I figured it would be fine.

what about salt?

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Post Post #589  (isolation #73)  » Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:21 pm

I'm definitely not an expert on the healthy, but I can help with simple and cost effective. One dish I would suggest learning to cook is fried rice. It's very cheap and very flexible. And if you have a rice cooker it's super easy (though I realize a lot of people don't have one).

If you buy rice at the asian market in large bags, it's quite cheap per serving. The down side is, if you're on a tight budget the investment of buying the bag might be a problem. Cooking it is very simple. Put it in a pot with the suggested amount of water, bring it to a boil and wait til the water is gone. If you have a rice cooker add rice and water push the button. For fried rice, you don't need freshly made rice so if you have leftover rice in the fridge, this is a good way to use it. I will make the rice ahead of time and let it get to room temp just because its easier.

For the rest, just get a frying pan and sautee whatever you have/feel like eating in your rice. I always use a base of onion and zucchini/yellow squash. Add in other things if I have it like garlic, pineapple, tomato, peppers, herbs. Just cook these how you normally would with some salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and sugar at the end. You can literaly use whatever veggies you have or like to eat. Also nuts and dried fruits can be good too. You can also cook some meat here, anything works. After this is pretty much cooked, I push it to the back of the pan and fry an egg or two. If you don't want meat this is a good way to have protein, unless you want to add some beans. I just scramble the egg(s) in the pan with a fork while they are cooking. Once the egg is cooked through. Toss on your rice and stir. Season with salt and sugar. Soy sauce also helps, and if you have a sweet cooking wine thats also nice. Then I just eat it straight out of the pan so i have less dishes to clean.


Stews are also great. Just buy cheap cuts of meat and slow cook them. I don't have a crockpot so I do it on a stove top.

For chicken quarters I like to stew in a mix of chicken stock (I just use bullion), brown sugar, Soy Sauce, cooking wine and cinnamon sticks (optional). If you find leg quarters on sale this works out great. Just peal the skin and toss them into the pot. Save the skin for starting fried rice. You can fry the veggies in the rendered chicken fat and chop up the crispy skin and sprinkle it over the fried rice for texture.

For pork I do: 3 parts Soy Sauce, 3 parts Sugar, 2 parts cooking wine, 1 part dark (balsamic) vinegar, 1 part ketchup. Just make enough to cover the pork. Buy whatever cuts are cheapest. The fatty ones are generally cheaper, and have more flavor anyway.

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Post Post #590  (isolation #74)  » Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:30 pm

avocados could work too

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Post Post #592  (isolation #75)  » Sun Oct 30, 2011 10:50 am

I just made popcorn on my stovetop for the first time. I couldn't believe how easy it is. And also is SO tasty just popping it in a little bit of olive oil with a sprinkle of salt pepper and sugar. I don't understand how the synthetic butter popcorn cornered the market on the world. I don't usually eat popcorn, but I've been assigned a project for an upcoming lab function. I think I will be make a snack of it more frequently, and hopefully it will be a healthy one.

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Post Post #594  (isolation #76)  » Sun Oct 30, 2011 11:53 am

what'd i do wrong?

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Post Post #597  (isolation #77)  » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:23 pm

the seasoning was added to the popcorn. Really no olive oil flavor passed on to it.
Sugar was just a teeny tiny pinch. You get a sweet piece every now and then, but not enough to make the popcorn taste sweet over all.

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Post Post #602  (isolation #78)  » Sun Oct 30, 2011 3:31 pm

In post 601, Kublai Khan wrote:Oh fuck. I've got weevils in my pasta.

Dammit dammit dammit

good source of protein

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Post Post #604  (isolation #79)  » Sun Oct 30, 2011 3:34 pm

good source of protein

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Post Post #617  (isolation #80)  » Wed Nov 02, 2011 1:00 pm

^hasn't trained his tongue^

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Post Post #621  (isolation #81)  » Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:51 pm

Hah, Olive Garden was the annual highlight. My Grandparents would visit for about a month and the trip would culminate in a night of endless breadsticks. My grandmother would even wrap up a basket in a napkin and stick them in her purse to take home because she didn't think they would give you them in a doggy bag.

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Post Post #624  (isolation #82)  » Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:58 pm

Hah, why the steak? You can get a doggy bag for that. The breadsticks are extra. My grandma knows the system. All those years at the Atlantic City buffets.

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Post Post #627  (isolation #83)  » Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:29 am

salty + sweet = heaven

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Post Post #633  (isolation #84)  » Wed Nov 09, 2011 9:48 am

In post 632, ortolan wrote:The bacon ice cream would just be like salted caramel, it would work fine. Hesthon Blumenthal has been making a big song and dance about making bacon and egg ice cream at The Fat Duck for ages.

I think the McGriddle was first

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Post Post #643  (isolation #85)  » Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:18 am

In post 642, VP Baltar wrote:There is no such thing as an aphrodisiac basically. Also, curry and relish....wtf

you forgot the maple syrup and brown mustard and anise extract

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Post Post #650  (isolation #86)  » Sun Apr 08, 2012 3:06 am

Made coffee and strawberry caramel corn last night
so good

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Post Post #654  (isolation #87)  » Mon Apr 09, 2012 5:40 pm

boiled cucumber sounds horrible

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Post Post #660  (isolation #88)  » Tue Apr 10, 2012 11:44 am

I miss corn
*sadface*

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Post Post #662  (isolation #89)  » Tue Apr 10, 2012 11:53 am

Corn is so good, and it was ubiquitous when I was growing up. Summer with my grandparents on the Jersey shore. Every day on the way home from the beach we'd stop off for corn fresh from the farm.

SO GOOOD

I also love a good corn salsa. Will definitely be making some on my next visit back to the states.

Best I can get in Germany is already husked corn in plastic wrap. Everyone tells me it is pig food here, so barely anyone eats it.

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Post Post #665  (isolation #90)  » Tue Apr 10, 2012 12:07 pm

better than dripping corn

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Post Post #670  (isolation #91)  » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:02 pm

duck so good
it will make to fat too
go get some

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Post Post #676  (isolation #92)  » Sun May 06, 2012 1:00 pm

Was playing with molten sugar last night and got a drop on my finger. Have a mad blister today. Will definitely be more careful in the future.

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Post Post #680  (isolation #93)  » Sun Jun 03, 2012 2:27 am

Do all Indians know how to make naan?
if so, could one tell me the secret

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Post Post #685  (isolation #94)  » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:54 am

i never get that flaky yet elastic texture as in restaurants
also whats the best cook surface if not owning a grill or an oven stone?

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Post Post #687  (isolation #95)  » Mon Jun 04, 2012 12:01 pm

my wifes oven has a broil function
I don't even have an oven in my apartment, just two burners *sadface*

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Post Post #721  (isolation #96)  » Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:59 am

hai there
sry hiking Acadia
Wish I had brought bacon trail mix

The only "strange" bacon sweet I've had as of late is a bacon candy bar and it just wasnt the right ratio of bacon to chocolate. So you just had these weird nondescript chewy meaty bits. I imagine the bacon sundae would be boss when fresh but horrible after sitting and getting the bacon a little soggy.

Also salt with Ice cream is great p much independent of the salt source. Pretzels and ice cream was a snack my grandmother would always make for me as a kid.

Have I mentioned Germany needs to get some proper bacon yet?

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Post Post #726  (isolation #97)  » Sat Jun 23, 2012 4:07 pm

OMG
want!!!!!!!

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Post Post #728  (isolation #98)  » Sat Jun 23, 2012 4:37 pm

I havent had bacon in forever being in Germany, but whenever I eat it I always try to use the fat for cooking. Frying eggs, making pancakes, "oil" for stir fry or fried rice. I love bacon fat, but never thought of making a spread out of it. Will have to try sometime.

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Post Post #733  (isolation #99)  » Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:41 pm

my wife loves that stuff
I'm not such a big fan

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Post Post #742  (isolation #100)  » Thu Jun 28, 2012 2:30 am

In post 739, Sheriff wrote:Dolphins are friendly and smart creatures, why the hell would you want to eat them you monster.
so are pigs

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Post Post #750  (isolation #101)  » Fri Jun 29, 2012 3:06 pm

seems like enough meat courses unless you dont have enough quantity
Pork meatballs (ginger and soy seasoned) in a clear broth? Not sure of the weather there, might be too hot for soup

Also never heard of shrimp rumika before, but I "invented" the same dish just using asparagus instead of water chestnut. Wrap it first, then steam the wrap. Then stir fry the wrap in sweet chili sauce. 1/4 slice bacon, 1/3 stick asparagus, 1/2 (lengthwise) shrimp per wrap. Flatten the bacon first with a cleaver

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Post Post #757  (isolation #102)  » Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:35 am

In post 753, VP Baltar wrote:what is pho?
really? I thought Oregon would have plenty of this. It's on every street corner in Seattle. It's quite cheap and comes with a free cream puff for dessert

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Post Post #762  (isolation #103)  » Fri Jul 13, 2012 11:42 am

In post 761, zoraster wrote:Sadly, there is a serious dearth of quality asian food in Austin.
try Bavaria

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Post Post #767  (isolation #104)  » Mon Jul 23, 2012 2:26 am

youre wrong

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Post Post #781  (isolation #105)  » Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:18 pm

We did omakase at Morimoto in Philadelphia
still dream about those scallops from time to time

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Post Post #791  (isolation #106)  » Wed Aug 01, 2012 5:12 pm

i thought perfect mash was one part butter one part potato, then feed it through a super fine sieve

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Post Post #796  (isolation #107)  » Thu Aug 02, 2012 4:54 am

I see youre Elton Brown and raise you a Heston Blumenthal

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Post Post #805  (isolation #108)  » Fri Aug 03, 2012 11:04 am

or you really like your rosemary

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Post Post #808  (isolation #109)  » Fri Aug 03, 2012 11:38 am

i'm not the whore
rosemary's the whore
that bitch

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Post Post #819  (isolation #110)  » Sun Aug 05, 2012 2:30 am

In post 817, Nuwen wrote:black. cunts.
someone's got jungle fever

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Post Post #821  (isolation #111)  » Sun Aug 05, 2012 12:11 pm

Bacon pancakes are the best pancakes

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Post Post #824  (isolation #112)  » Tue Aug 07, 2012 9:23 am

yes
yes it is

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Post Post #827  (isolation #113)  » Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:58 pm

he really shouldnt be doing that with cast iron

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Post Post #830  (isolation #114)  » Wed Aug 08, 2012 10:57 am

people keep ground spices?

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Post Post #832  (isolation #115)  » Wed Aug 08, 2012 1:50 pm

I just dont use it if my only options are powder
which keeps my cooking options simpler. I also dont have a grinder. I either do stews where I can use them whole or slowly grate them down with a table knife

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Post Post #834  (isolation #116)  » Wed Aug 08, 2012 2:30 pm

I dont do many cuisines that use those spices
My spices are cinnamon, star anise, black peppercorns and dried chilis
I can buy most herbs fresh in a pot from the grocery store across the street so I just do that if I need any herbs and keep the rest in my window until they start to flower

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Post Post #853  (isolation #117)  » Thu Aug 09, 2012 12:57 am

In post 851, Amrun wrote:There's no way I can clean it out properly? Because if contimation is going to be an issue for everything, then how am I even going to grind two spices in it?

I think coffee is much stronger than anything else you would grind in it. At least that's what I've heard, one for coffee one for spices

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Post Post #879  (isolation #118)  » Sun Aug 12, 2012 4:42 pm

Made a pair of personal sized pizzas with mozzarella, roasted grape tomatoes and basil from scratch last night to fulfill my mozzarella cravings
Sauce, tomatoes and cheese were fantastic. Need to work on the dough recipe though

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Post Post #881  (isolation #119)  » Mon Aug 13, 2012 1:30 am

no
you shouldnt do that to rice
and macaroni & cheese is officially the best thing to pair with BBQ
I am craving BBQ though

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Post Post #883  (isolation #120)  » Mon Aug 13, 2012 11:05 am

I may have had the biggest caramel corn breakthrough ever
if i can get the supplies, update on the weekend

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Post Post #890  (isolation #121)  » Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:08 am

Fish is p limited in Bavaria
I miss Seattle's salmon season

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Post Post #892  (isolation #122)  » Tue Aug 21, 2012 2:42 am

EVERYTHING!

basically anything you would cook with oil and you want to taste like bacon, do that. Short list:
Eggs, pancakes, french toast, popped corn, asparagus, fish scallops and/or shrimp, spinach or heavier greens, potatoes, slather it on corn, fried rice, sauteed onions/mushrooms/peppers

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Post Post #895  (isolation #123)  » Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:18 am

I never save it though, anytime I cook with bacon I always use the fat to cook whatever is going with it
bacon fried rice is so good

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Post Post #898  (isolation #124)  » Tue Aug 21, 2012 9:09 am

I guess its already winter up there in Sweden

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Post Post #900  (isolation #125)  » Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:46 am

where do you keep it so that it doesnt dry out?

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Post Post #914  (isolation #126)  » Sat Sep 22, 2012 4:10 am

salmon looks really good

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Post Post #930  (isolation #127)  » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:15 am

Made maple bacon caramel corn last night
its really good

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Post Post #933  (isolation #128)  » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:53 am

3 parts sugar to 2 parts water by volume

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Post Post #938  (isolation #129)  » Fri Dec 14, 2012 2:33 am

In post 937, orcinus_theoriginal wrote:Planning to take the girlfriend to Jean Georges in Shanghai when I visit for New Years. Going to cost 250 USD, depending on how much alcohol we order. Heard it's got a good atmosphere, and heck it's Jean Georges even I know who that is.

Will post back with results! Definitely excited for this dinner!
Just eat street food the whole time
it'll taste better and cost 250RMB fir the whole trip
and you get to play food poisoning roulette!

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Post Post #940  (isolation #130)  » Fri Dec 14, 2012 3:16 am

I got really bad food poisoning from the train
There was also an Italian looking guy in Shanghai that tried to sell us a slice of cake off the back of his bike. It had a line of dirt across the top of it from what his wheel was kicking up. Think that would have caused us some problems

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Post Post #1263  (isolation #131)  » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:19 am

I think theyre just marinating your cat
you might want to find a new vet

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Post Post #1290  (isolation #132)  » Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:01 pm

That is one massive rice cooker, and I'm jealous of your machine.

You should also make some 60 degree eggs in it

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Post Post #1295  (isolation #133)  » Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:53 am

i actually dont like grilling

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Post Post #1300  (isolation #134)  » Tue Mar 25, 2014 11:25 am

your pancakes are so thin
feed them more

*note, as with all things it is best to substitute bacon fat for butter

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Post Post #1303  (isolation #135)  » Wed Mar 26, 2014 8:43 am

In post 1302, Uite wrote:
In post 1300, shaft.ed wrote:your pancakes are so thin
feed them more


Well, your pancakes are tiny!

Actually I think pancakes are a very interesting dish, because pretty much every culture has them, but even though they're very simple to prepare and only require basic ingredients, they are all very different. Really, the variety of ‘pancake’ worldwide is staggering!
They are commonly referred to as silver dollar pancakes. But my great grandmother used to make them full pan sized. Which caused much stomach stretching the first time she asked my father and uncle how many pancakes they wanted for breakfast.

IMHO, I think if its called a cake it should have some amount of spongingess to it.

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Post Post #1320  (isolation #136)  » Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:04 pm

In post 1313, zoraster wrote:Sushi rice (short grained rice, you cannot use long grain rice), a good sharp knife, a bamboo mat for the rolls, and sushi grade fish. Rice cooker makes it easier.

dont forget to season your rice. you can buy premixed bottles, or do your own mix of mirin and vinegar.

I would also recommend making chirashi if you are having trouble with the rolls. Way less work, can present nicely and tastes the same

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Post Post #1322  (isolation #137)  » Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:02 pm

Made this tonight:
Spoiler:
Image
*disclaimer, not my pic

Paired it with chinese broccoli and some fresh pickles
God i love this dish
general recipe here. I usually cut back on the ingredients a bit.

Best part is, there are leftovers. Lunch tomorrow is going to be awesome

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Post Post #1326  (isolation #138)  » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:31 am

In post 1323, chamber wrote:Who the heck calls bok choi broccoli???

I served it with chinese broccoli (lan gai)
Spoiler:
Image

While I like baby shanghai bok choy better, it is best stir fried because its bitterness only goes away at very high heat. That's why I went with chinese brocolli because I didn't want an oily veg with pork belly, and I find it best served just blanched with a light saucing.

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Post Post #1327  (isolation #139)  » Sun Apr 06, 2014 6:35 am

I tried making red cooked fishhead
but the broth has gone cloudy and milky, possibly because I neglected to remove the gills
maybe turn it into fish and tofu soup?

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Post Post #1331  (isolation #140)  » Mon Apr 07, 2014 6:22 am

-Were you deep frying these? That you mention a nonstick pan makes me think you were just sauteing them, which I don't think would work so well as the heat is not very high or uniform.
-How long did they take to cook? Low heat allows a lot of oil to soak into your batter before it cooks, and it can fall off in the process

Another option would be baking them.

As for flavor, the battering is usually where the coconut flavor comes from for this, aside from possibly a sauce. I almost always marinate shrimp in mirin with some soy sauce, but this might fight with the coconut flavor you are going for.

Also, I wouldn't cook this in straight peanut oil. Should deep fry them in canola oil since it takes a higher heat and its way cheaper for the volume you would need

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Post Post #1346  (isolation #141)  » Sat Apr 19, 2014 9:23 pm

I've been searching around for the perfect steamed bun recipe for some time now. Tried another one tonight, the flavor and density was right but they came out strangely dry and crumbly for bread that cooked in the steamer. Not really sure what went wrong there, perhaps too much fat ended up repelling the moisture?
Image

Then made some stir fried pork, green onion and yellow squash with a sweet and sticky shaoxing reduction to make sandwiches with. They were tasty.
Image

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Post Post #1348  (isolation #142)  » Sat Apr 19, 2014 9:52 pm

thanks

I love steamed bread. And my last apartment didnt have an oven so steaming was a good option. I also really like my breads and cakes moist, so I'm usually happy with the results.

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Post Post #1353  (isolation #143)  » Mon Apr 21, 2014 3:26 pm

Food looks really scrumptious Fenchurch

In post 1350, Fenchurch wrote:Those steamed buns look really nice, shafted! I don't think I've ever eaten any but I have wanted to try them for ages; not sure if vegetarian fillings are especially common, though.
I like them plain or rolled with scallions. This way is great for dipping in sauces/soups.
You can stuff them with veggie fillings, but usually if they are veg heavy (cabbage most common) they still have some ground pork. They are also traditional as dessert with red bean paste for filling. But you can do anything you want with the dough. When zoraster was hosting his mishmash cooking thread, I stuffed them with basil and roasted grape tomatoes. I'll probably try revamping that recipe this summer when tomatoes are good.

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Post Post #1356  (isolation #144)  » Mon Apr 21, 2014 11:22 pm

I was jealous of your cookies so I made these

First time making cookies. Was a bit painful because my brown sugar had turned into a brick. I found the only way to break it down was between my thumb and forefinger. Came out P tasty though.

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Post Post #1358  (isolation #145)  » Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:43 am

yeah
But I dont think I browned it enough because the flavor wasnt as nutty as expected

May have had my heat up too high cause I was getting some burnt particulate and I didn't want them to taste like charcoal. Still getting used to my stovetop.

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Post Post #1366  (isolation #146)  » Tue Apr 22, 2014 3:25 pm

In post 1359, quadz08 wrote:Interesting. I'd never heard of browning butter before. I'll have to give that a try.

browning butter at all, or browning butter for baked goods?
if you've never had brown butter pasta you need to rectify your life asap

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Post Post #1367  (isolation #147)  » Wed Apr 23, 2014 3:19 pm

Speaking of rectifying ones life. I feel like I'm too asiocentric in my cooking. But a lot of that is because I'm cheap and don't want to buy a whole nother set of core ingredients. Can anyone suggest some classic "european" dishes that are rather uncomplicated on the input side. I'd prefer something using cheap meat cuts that are lovingly simmered for long periods of time.

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Post Post #1372  (isolation #148)  » Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:08 pm

In post 1369, zoraster wrote:
In post 1367, shaft.ed wrote:Speaking of rectifying ones life. I feel like I'm too asiocentric in my cooking. But a lot of that is because I'm cheap and don't want to buy a whole nother set of core ingredients. Can anyone suggest some classic "european" dishes that are rather uncomplicated on the input side. I'd prefer something using cheap meat cuts that are lovingly simmered for long periods of time.


Braised meat fits this well.

yeah i was thinking maybe coq au vin or braised oxtail if i can find it

kinda wanna do some of the classics I've never eaten

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Post Post #1373  (isolation #149)  » Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:08 pm

In post 1370, quadz08 wrote:Never even heard of it. GOOGLETYME
not thyme, use sage

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Post Post #1376  (isolation #150)  » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:44 pm

In post 1374, quadz08 wrote:so those cookies are cooling RIGHT NOW

they smell awesome so that's a good sign

why wait?

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Post Post #1381  (isolation #151)  » Sat Apr 26, 2014 9:32 pm

lol, I tried making bacon sugar cookies, but they didn't spread out when cooked. So i ended up with bacon scones

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Post Post #1382  (isolation #152)  » Sat Apr 26, 2014 10:24 pm

fairly tasty. I guess bacon fat can hold less flour as a dough than butter
live an learn
Image

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Post Post #1397  (isolation #153)  » Sat May 17, 2014 9:37 pm

Hah, I'm about to make a batch tomorrow to take to Germany for my old lab. (I'm also bringing Wonderbread and Velveeta to make some grilled cheese sammiches)
And I agree, best chocolate chip cookies I've had

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Post Post #1401  (isolation #154)  » Sun May 18, 2014 8:55 am

There are certain food products I wasn't able to accurately portray to them. Classic 'white bread' and 'cheese products' were near the top of the list. If I were gonna dress it up, I would bring some proper bacon and add a tomato slice in there. But yeah, I'm bringing the cookies so they don't hate me for the cheese.

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Post Post #1404  (isolation #155)  » Sun May 18, 2014 9:39 am

yeah I don't eat any of the junk food that filled up my childhood
But husking corn is like a time machine that transports me back to my grandparents backyard in Jersey

When I was in middle school/high shool we would sometimes have nacho night. My mom would melt down a big pot of velveeta and toss in some chopped veggies (onion, pepper and lettuce i think) and whatever meat was lying around and we'd scoop it up with tortilla chips. Think that's the last time I had Velveeta

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Post Post #1408  (isolation #156)  » Sun May 18, 2014 3:49 pm

In post 1405, quadz08 wrote:The only thing we use velveeta for is making queso. I can't imagine putting it on a sandwich. >_<

it makes a passible grilled cheese

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Post Post #1411  (isolation #157)  » Sat May 31, 2014 5:22 pm

Banh mi for dinner tonight
haven't had one in years
should eat more often

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Post Post #1412  (isolation #158)  » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:09 pm

gonna try making black garlic
yippee

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Post Post #1414  (isolation #159)  » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:34 pm

really fucking good
seriously, so good I had to curse
And it wasnt even fresh

Next time I go to Chinatown I will definitely get more

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Post Post #1417  (isolation #160)  » Fri Jun 06, 2014 7:35 am

I'll let you know how it goes
you cook it at a low temp for 9 days, then dry it for 9 more
Apparently the "warm" setting on a rice cooker is the right temp

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Post Post #1418  (isolation #161)  » Fri Jun 06, 2014 6:25 pm

so my apartment is like living in a thick slice of garlic bread
swimming in garlic bread

according to sources this will happen for approximately three days
not sure if apartment will now permanently smell of garlic

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Post Post #1427  (isolation #162)  » Sat Jun 07, 2014 12:48 pm

where's the exhaust?

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Post Post #1433  (isolation #163)  » Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:18 pm

When I was in St. Louis we treated mint as a weed
never were able to eradicate it

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Post Post #1442  (isolation #164)  » Sun Jun 08, 2014 5:16 pm

After my apartment in Munich I can get by with so much less counter space than what I used to think I needed
My crappy studio apartment kitchen in Boston now feels like a 4 star cooking facility

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Post Post #1444  (isolation #165)  » Sun Jun 08, 2014 5:35 pm

P much. In Munich I had a rice cooker, two burners and a dorm fridge.
Counter space was literally a cutting board

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Post Post #1446  (isolation #166)  » Mon Jun 09, 2014 7:27 am

I didnt say there was any floor space
There was enough room to stand, one step backward and you were out of the kitchen
it did have ample shelving though. Two converted bookcases and some Ikea shelves mounted over the stovetop/sink
I used to have pics up here, but the internets ate them

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Post Post #1448  (isolation #167)  » Mon Jun 09, 2014 4:15 pm

roasted a salmon head last night. Was pretty tasty, but I was a bit upset to waste all that fatty/gelatinousy/skin goodness. Definitey will make a stock or soup with the trimmings next time. But it was a bit too hot this weekend.

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Post Post #1451  (isolation #168)  » Mon Jun 09, 2014 4:36 pm

one of my local grocery stores sells them dirt cheap
Got like a 1.5 lb head for $2-2.50

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Post Post #1453  (isolation #169)  » Mon Jun 09, 2014 5:08 pm

I'm in Boston, but yeah they were way better in Seattle. Not a ton of meat on the head, but the cheek meat is quite good. The face is also pretty fatty so it is quite succulent. And lots of scale free skin if you are into crispy fish skin.

My parents like doing the cedar plank for salmon filets. It's pretty good, but they are cheap and reuse the planks to the point that you dont taste anything.

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Post Post #1455  (isolation #170)  » Mon Jun 09, 2014 5:30 pm

In post 1454, Colm wrote:I had a whole one I probably would give most of it to the pets.
*sadface*
salmon is probably my favorite fish

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Post Post #1457  (isolation #171)  » Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:20 am

garlic is turning black
p cool

apartment still like swimming in garlic bread

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Post Post #1468  (isolation #172)  » Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:22 am

Just use the leftovers for cooking
Better wine will give you better food

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Post Post #1471  (isolation #173)  » Fri Jun 13, 2014 11:17 am

Marco Pierre White told me that
so it must be true

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Post Post #1474  (isolation #174)  » Sat Jun 14, 2014 1:10 pm

I have garlic that is black
Spoiler:
Image


Supposed to let it dry now for another week (although some are already dried)
tastes good, but not sure worth the trouble
little bit more burnt flavor than I expected, perhaps too much heat?

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Post Post #1476  (isolation #175)  » Sat Jun 14, 2014 2:34 pm

yeah you can see that mine have some pale tips. Leaves them with a bit more bite I think. I always kept them in the same orientation. I think flipping them would have helped. Besides that they appear uniform throughout

I haven't had storebought so I can't compare

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Post Post #1480  (isolation #176)  » Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:52 pm

In post 1477, mykonian wrote:Ok, flipped them now, just to make sure!

Storebought ones were very soft, I don't remember a burned taste :(
I chopped one clove up to rub down my chicken thigh for dinner tonight. It had the consistency of hard candy. They arent all like that, but something definitely went wrong with my batch.

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Post Post #1483  (isolation #177)  » Tue Jun 17, 2014 5:05 pm

just squeeze a bit to see if its petrified

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Post Post #1487  (isolation #178)  » Tue Jun 17, 2014 11:09 pm

Going to try making ice cream
with science

have some peaches soaking in the cream overnight

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Post Post #1489  (isolation #179)  » Wed Jun 18, 2014 7:31 am

mixture is quite peachy this morning
will freeze tonight

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Post Post #1493  (isolation #180)  » Wed Jun 18, 2014 5:29 pm

3 hr resting for a good film is p crazy
i guess I understand the stress of macarons on cooking competition shows a little better now

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Post Post #1496  (isolation #181)  » Wed Jun 18, 2014 5:52 pm

gator

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Post Post #1498  (isolation #182)  » Wed Jun 18, 2014 7:32 pm

In post 1489, shaft.ed wrote:mixture is quite peachy this morning
will freeze tonight

holy crap that was fun
I used the powdered dry ice method to freeze
it's like reverse melting ice cream
And if you eat it straight away it tastes carbonated like soda. Somewhat interesting, but not worth the health risks

Bonus-I now have a pot of dry ice to use as free aircon :o

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Post Post #1499  (isolation #183)  » Wed Jun 18, 2014 8:06 pm

entirely undiscernable pic added

Spoiler:
Image

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Post Post #1500  (isolation #184)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:17 am

So I still have enough heavy cream for another batch of ice cream. Was thinking of making:

-Pretzel
-Bacon
-White pepper (maybe with mango)

which one?

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Post Post #1503  (isolation #185)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:06 am

In post 1502, zoraster wrote:Pretzel might be cool, but I think it's going to be hard to make sure it remains crunchy.
plan was to soak some pretzels in the cream overnight to get the flavor in the base. Then mix in some chocolate covered pretzels during the freeze

bacon would be similar except use bacon fat in the cream, and some candied bacon and maple syrup added during the freeze.

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Post Post #1506  (isolation #186)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:18 am

I already bought a bottle of maple syrup for bacon popcorn making
so right now it is sitting in the fridge with nothing to do

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Post Post #1514  (isolation #187)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 4:42 pm

In post 1511, mykonian wrote:Had a look at one today, color of the clove was brownish, still hard, tasted a little bit and it was still sharp. They did shrink quite a bit already, but it's not what I was looking for. I hope my rice cooker isn't straight up too cold, that it's warm enough that it will just take a little longer. I have time. Next time I get to look at it is next week, then about 20 days in.
Do you have them in contact with the bowl or are you using a "hammock" like method?

Sudo, should probably be cut bite-sized ish

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Post Post #1516  (isolation #188)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 4:53 pm

ok, yeah i guess the warm function are different from one to the next
I feel like mine was too warm. They started blackening in about 6 days, and as I said gave off a burnt taste
I ended up just throwing away my batch

from what I've read, too low heat is probably less a problem than too high, so don't lose hope

shaft.ed
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Post Post #1517  (isolation #189)  » Fri Jun 20, 2014 4:55 pm

In post 1500, shaft.ed wrote:So I still have enough heavy cream for another batch of ice cream. Was thinking of making:

-Pretzel
-Bacon
-White pepper (maybe with mango)

which one?

I settled on pretzel, but then was talking to some co-workers and they said there is no way to make a good tasting bacon ice cream. So now I want to make that just to prove a point :/

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Post Post #1520  (isolation #190)  » Sun Jun 22, 2014 10:55 am

Desalted two big handfuls of pretzels yesterday and soaked them in heavy cream
removed soaked pretzels from the heavy cream and mixed into ice cream base.
Still tastes of pretzels. Can't wait to freeze it tonight

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Post Post #1522  (isolation #191)  » Sun Jun 22, 2014 6:58 pm

So my ice cream came out badass in case you were wondering

gonna take it to work tomorrow to get confirmation from people that aren't me

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Post Post #1524  (isolation #192)  » Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:59 am

I'm making it with dry ice
just stir in powdered dry ice until it freezes
Has the added point of interest of being carbonated for the first few hours after freezing, very interested in trying this for sorbets

I'm not gonna bother with a pic. It just looks like off-white ice cream with bits of chocolate covered pretzel (the hard small kind for Europeans out there) floating around in it.

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Post Post #1525  (isolation #193)  » Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:50 pm

So other people ate the pretzel ice cream and testified it was awesome
I've even managed to get a few people to flip on trying bacon ice cream. Should I get around to making it.

But next up is carbonated watermelon sorbet. Once I finish the peach ice cream in the fridge

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Post Post #1535  (isolation #194)  » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:00 am

raw corn is p awesome

you can also slow cook on your stovetop. That's what I do when it is hot here to avoid using the oven. Also rice cooker instead of pasta as boiling water generates way more heat than needed to cook something

essentially use cooking methods that apply the most heat to the food and 'waste' less of it on your room

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Post Post #1538  (isolation #195)  » Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:27 am

I eat rice daily. It's awesome to dump it in with a small amount of water and get perfect rice every time. Rice cooker is the only appliance I have in my kitchen

you can also cook rice on the stovetop with just enough water to cook it, when you are finished no water is left. With pasta you always have to boil more water than you need which generates more heat.

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Post Post #1544  (isolation #196)  » Tue Jul 08, 2014 7:51 am

I think the best rice you get is from a pot, because it gives you a crust that is missing from rice cookers. We always fought over the crusty bits when I was a kid. But rice cookers are just soooo much more convenient.

The key to making good rice is buying good rice. A lot of options in the grocery stores are p crap (I'm looking at you Uncle Ben). Whatever you do, don't buy anything labelled 'minute rice'. And you also have to figure out what varieties of rice you prefer to eat. My parents don't like Jasmine very much. My father in law hates basmati. And i don't particularly like spanish rice.

Also with pasta salads, is it the creaminess that bothers you? Have you tried vinegar based dressings?

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Post Post #1546  (isolation #197)  » Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:03 am

A pretty simple pasta salad I like is with buckwheat noodles, chopped into about 1.5-2 inch strips. Cherry tomatoes halved, julianed cucumber and crumbled feta. Dress with olive oil, balsamic, salt, sugar and pepper to taste.

For rice, I'm always eating Milagrosa Jasmine rice. Even knowing the variety, some brands are crappy. I also have trouble buying the same brand because the asian markets are always changing out their stock. I just remember elephants and dragons are usually better. But no more than two elephants. Avoid pheonixes and color printed scenery.

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Post Post #1548  (isolation #198)  » Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:47 pm

I dont think heating a corn kernel for a few minutes alters its molecular composition enough to allow for more digestion than a raw kernel. Try more chewing.

You can boil rice and take off the excess water when it is finished cooking, much like pasta

you also dont even need a knife to open a watermelon. Just smash it on a pointy edge

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Post Post #1550  (isolation #199)  » Tue Jul 08, 2014 2:44 pm

no it yeilds normal rice
if you keep cooking it and dont take out the water you end up with congee

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