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Post Post #14  (isolation #0)  » Sun Aug 15, 2010 7:50 pm

You've already got the fajita thing going (try tacos too!). You could do more baja badassery with a black bean + pork stew in a truncheon of bread. Look for a good sofrito recipe for the stew base.

enchiladas sound so good right now.
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Post Post #23  (isolation #1)  » Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:50 am

the local culture of my city has sort of embraced grocery store sushi, but only because the wegman's chains employ lower tier sushi chefs. it's called "wushi."

http://rocwiki.org/Local_Slang
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Post Post #26  (isolation #2)  » Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:16 am

yeah, at least wegmans uses fishproduct that's brought in from NYC harbors. i've definitely ridden chinabus back to rochester in the company of raw fish.
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Post Post #35  (isolation #3)  » Tue Aug 17, 2010 4:21 am

Ythill wrote:Or maybe a repeat of the espresso-filled eclairs


SOLD
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Post Post #280  (isolation #4)  » Tue Oct 26, 2010 5:45 am

i fucking hate this website and its influence on my gallivants through informationspace. i researched all factors affecting fried potato nutritional value, which includes fat content

4. Reduction of fat uptake

4.1. Modification of frying techniques

4.1.1. Properties of the potato strips

A. Moisture/Surface moisture
The properties of the potato are very important in producing French fries of good quality.
Potatoes at some times of the year have a very high moisture content and produce more soggy
French fries. Potatoes used for frying should be low in sugar and moisture and have a specific
gravity of 1.08 or more with 1.1 preferred. Some sugar is required to provide colour and
flavour, but if it is too high the sugar and fat produce bitter flavours. An increase in the
density of potato tuber also leads to a decrease in fat absorption. In one study of fried potato
chips, tubers with a higher density (1.103 g/cm3) yielded chips with lower fat content (42.1%)
than slices with lower density of 1.093 g/cm3 (48.8% fat) (Ufheil & Escher, 1996).

B. Size and shape of potato strips
The thickness of the potato strips is an important factor affecting the overall fat content of
French fries. Thick-cut strips (12 mm or bigger) absorb less fat than thin-cut strips. The fat
content in French fries decreases with increasing cross-section area of potato sticks, and fat is
restricted to the surface of the sticks. Cracks and rough surfaces increase the surface area and
thus increase the fat absorption. Ideally, all potato sticks need to be cut to the same
dimensions, with a fairly uniform cross section and, to a lesser extent, length to allow for
uniform cooking (Blumentahl, 1991).


4.1.2. Preprocessing of French fries

In the preparation of French fries , several processes are involved. The most common
sequence is cutting – blanching – drying – pre-frying – freezing/chilling – packing – thawing.
Each step may be important for the final product quality. The fat uptake varies with the pre-
treatment of the potato.

A. Blanching
Blanching is a processing step whereby potatoes are heated in steam or water for 2 to 3 min.
This inactivates enzymes and prolongs the storage life of frozen fries. Moreover, blanching
reduces the subsequent cooking time. Blanching also makes the colour more uniform after
frying and it forms a layer of gelatinized starch that limits oil absorption and improves texture
(Moreira, 1999).
Low temperature blanching enhances pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity and is another
option proposed that affects both textural quality and oil uptake (Aguilar et al., 1999). In
potatoes and most vegetables, texture depends on the presence of pectic substances, which are
part of the intercellular material. PME hydrolyses the methyl ester bonds in pectin leaving
free carboxylic groups that can then react with divalent ions such as calcium and magnesium,
increasing firmness (Miranda & Aguilera, 2006).

B. Drying
Drying the surface of the potato strips before frying reduces the fat uptake in French fries. In
the experiments of Lamberg et al. (1990) drying reduced the fat uptake by 7 to 29% (for 1 min
frying) and by 15 to 40% (for 5 min frying). Drying causes a ‘skin’ to form on the surface of
the potato strip and this reduces vapour transport through the surface layer.

C. Freezing
The method of freezing fries has an important impact on the fat content and other qualities
after they are deep fried. French fries are frozen either cryogenically (rapid freezing) or
mechanically (slow freezing). Cryogenically frozen chips have a lower fat content and better
organoleptic qualities. Kock et al. (1995) compared the quality of fries that had been frozen
by these two different methods. During cryogenic freezing the water losses were minimal
compared with the water losses caused by the moving air (blast air) in mechanical freezing.
Thus, cryogenically dried fries had significantly higher moisture content (73%) than the
mechanically frozen fries (67%). Rapid freezing resulted in better quality fries. This can be
explained by the structural damage caused by the slow freezing rate of mechanical freezing.
The large ice crystals that form during the process damage the surrounding tissues. During
frying, some of the moisture is removed, and more fat is absorbed into the holes left by the ice crystals. Thus, cryogenically frozen fries have a lower fat content despite starting with a
higher moisture content.

4.1.3. Frying practices/procedures

A. Temperature
Very high temperatures shorten the life of the fat. Raising the temperature of the fat higher
than 185°C causes the fat to break down more rapidly due to an increased rate of oxidation
and polymer formation in the fat. When frying at 200°C or above, excess energy in the fat is
converted into cross-links leading to case-hardening of food. This results in a brown surface
forming on the food before the inside is completely cooked and immersing the food for a
longer time to cook the inside properly may cause burning on the outside (Blumenthal &
Stier, 1991). In some countries maximum frying temperature is set at 180°C.
On the other hand, if French fries are cooked at lower temperature, or the ‘boiling action’ on
the surface ceases due to a lower heat input, the crust does not form on the surface. This
allows extra fat to penetrate into the core of the French fries. About 40% more fat is absorbed
when the fat temperature is 10°C lower than the recommended cooking temperature of 180°C
to 185°C (Mehta & Swinburn, 2001).

B. Number of fryings
An increased number of fryings degrades the frying fat, thus affecting the fat absorption. In
one study, sets of 500g of potatoes were fried discontinuously 15 times in 3 litres of sunflower
oil without the addition of fresh fat. The fat content of the fried potatoes increased
significantly with the number of fryings from 26.7 to 29.5 %. According to Blumenthal
(1991), the more altered the fat is, the higher the content of polar compounds, the higher the
surfactant production, and the higher the fat content of the food. However, Sebedio et al.
(1990) described no significant differences between the 1st and the 30th frying operation in
either peanut or soybean fat.

C. Mixed frying
When fat-containing food such as chicken, sausages, and other meat products are fried, some
of the fat from these foods is extracted during cooking and replaced with the cooking fat. This
exchange of components, including fat and salt, changes the composition of the frying fat
during the cooking process. Moreover, this extracted fat is in a natural unrefined state that is
more unstable and causes darkening of the fat. Potatoes fried in this fat are of reduced quality.
Therefore it is preferable to use a separate fryer for the cooking of French fries and the same
fat should not be used for frying of different foods. In addition, enclosing such foods in batter
tends to reduce the contamination of the frying fat by the food being cooked (Mehta &
Swinburn, 2001).

6
4.2. Modification of frying medium

The medium in which frying takes place is usually a triglyceride oil. The use of triglycerides
with polyunsaturated fatty acids is desired from a health point of view. Even though it may
influence key quality factors of the fried food like texture and appearance (Brinkmann, 2000),
it is a widely accepted view that the balance of fatty acids does not significantly influence fat
uptake (Bognar, 1998).
A minor positive correlation between oil uptake and oxidative degradation of the frying fat
has been identified (Dobarganes et al., 2000). The reason for this is probably a combination of
decreased oil/air surface tension and increased oil viscosity. Respectively, these are affected
by the formation of polar and polymer compounds (see also above section 4.1.3.B Number of
fryings).
Would it be possible to affect the oil viscosity sufficiently to obtain a reduced fat uptake?
Even though theory predicts that the viscosity of hot oil affects oil uptake, it will not be easy
to control this parameter. A high oil viscosity, or a steeply increasing oil viscosity upon
cooling will decrease oil uptake because oil flow is hampered especially in the small pores.
However the same will lead to less easy drainage or shaking of the oil from the food after it is
taken out of the frying oil. In principle the total amount of oil adhering to the food determines
the maximum amount of oil that can enter the pores. This suggests that easy drainage can be
beneficial (Mellema, 2003).

No food-grade techniques are available yet that alter the wetting/surface tension
characteristics sufficiently to obtain a significant reduction in fat uptake over the whole
timescale of using a specific batch of frying fat. There seems, however, some potential in
delaying the degradation. Up to now the positive correlation between oil degradation and
uptake has not been exploited for the development of frying fats with claimed reduced fat
uptake. The reason for this is probably that the effect of antioxidants like ascorbyl palmitate,
phytosterols, tocopherols, tocotrienols and avenasterols on fat uptake is too small. Most
antioxidants will break down quickly because of the high temperatures involved and the
presence of a diverse range of chemicals (also formed in reaction with the fried foods)
(Mellama, 2003).


4.3. Coatings and batters

Since the properties of the surface of the food are most important for fat uptake, the
application of a coating is a promising route. This coating can be thin and invisible or thick
like a batter.
As previously mentioned, one of the most often mentioned parameters for reducing fat uptake
at the level of the food composition is the moisture content. In principle only the outer layer
of the food needs to have low moisture content, which can also be achieved by applying a
low-moisture level coating. Hydrophilic biopolymers can be used as water binders in a
coating to reduce water loss from the coat. Most commercial biopolymer coating that are
claimed to act like this to reduce fat uptake, are polysaccharide coatings. For instance corn
zein and gellan gum coatings have been claimed to reduce fat diffusivity. Some coatings are
claimed to be ‘more firm’, thereby reducing evaporation (damage). Often the increase in
firmness is brought about by thermogelling action or crosslinking. The resulting high gel
strength leads to less evaporation damage and hence to a lower water diffusivity (Mellema,
2003).

4.3. Coatings and batters

Since the properties of the surface of the food are most important for fat uptake, the
application of a coating is a promising route. This coating can be thin and invisible or thick
like a batter.
As previously mentioned, one of the most often mentioned parameters for reducing fat uptake
at the level of the food composition is the moisture content. In principle only the outer layer
of the food needs to have low moisture content, which can also be achieved by applying a
low-moisture level coating. Hydrophilic biopolymers can be used as water binders in a
coating to reduce water loss from the coat. Most commercial biopolymer coating that are
claimed to act like this to reduce fat uptake, are polysaccharide coatings. For instance corn
zein and gellan gum coatings have been claimed to reduce fat diffusivity. Some coatings are
claimed to be ‘more firm’, thereby reducing evaporation (damage). Often the increase in
firmness is brought about by thermogelling action or crosslinking. The resulting high gel
strength leads to less evaporation damage and hence to a lower water diffusivity (Mellema,
2003).
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Post Post #399  (isolation #5)  » Sun Feb 20, 2011 10:30 am

Nothing makes me happier than produce.

Image
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Post Post #679  (isolation #6)  » Wed May 30, 2012 5:44 pm

Mashed an avocado and mixed it with ground turkey and panko to make patties, seasoned with a bit of cumin, cayenne, and black pepper. Going to serve on wheat buns with a slab of gouda.
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Post Post #684  (isolation #7)  » Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:57 am

I've had a lot of success baking naan bread over open flame on a BBQ grill lined with foil. I've made it with both sweet butter and ghee, and actually liked the butter version better. What kind of problems are you guys having with your naan?

My first attempt was too fluffy and not chewy enough, which happened because I didn't knead the dough for long enough before letting it rise. You need to fucking beat that gluten into submission.
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Post Post #686  (isolation #8)  » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:58 am

Do you have a broiler?
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Post Post #688  (isolation #9)  » Mon Jun 04, 2012 12:08 pm

:(
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Post Post #708  (isolation #10)  » Tue Jun 12, 2012 3:23 pm

One of my favorite student-written short stories is about a high school kid with crabs. As he goes about his day, the crabs grow progressively larger and eventually become anthropomorphic. Around homeroom time the kid just scratches his itchy crotch. During lunch he feels many things crawl around in his shorts, but can't see them. By final bell his shorts are leaking full-sized bay crabs, which become bipedal and kill everyone.
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Post Post #712  (isolation #11)  » Thu Jun 14, 2012 4:47 pm

The what with the what
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Post Post #736  (isolation #12)  » Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:48 pm

Making a variation of this at the NuNest tonight, with whole-wheat tortillas, white corn, habaneros, and lots of fresh cilantro. The cut of steak I'm using is pretty pot roast-y and tough, so I'm probably letting it simmer for upwards of 45 minutes+.
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Post Post #811  (isolation #13)  » Sat Aug 04, 2012 9:04 am

Back forest pancakes with homemade whipped cream.
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Post Post #812  (isolation #14)  » Sat Aug 04, 2012 9:06 am

I made bacon too, because why the fuck not.
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Post Post #817  (isolation #15)  » Sat Aug 04, 2012 10:15 pm

black. cunts.
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Post Post #888  (isolation #16)  » Sat Aug 18, 2012 6:18 pm

I never buy unfrozen salmon unless I know I'll be eating it raw, and I've only made my own salmon sashimi/sushi once ever in my life.

<_<
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Post Post #908  (isolation #17)  » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:40 pm

Had one of my more complicated dishes (to date) tonight.

Salt/sugar cured some salmon fillets for about an hour, then let them seep in a sake & chile marinade for another hour+. Flash-seared the cuts on the stovetop then transferred the pan to a moderately warm oven until flakey.

Reduced the marinade to a couple spoonfuls of thickened sauce, used for basting.

Served with citrus-veggie quinoa (bell pepper, onion, carrot, cooked with orange juice and a splash more of sake in lieu of water) and sparkling plum sake.

Image
Image
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:D
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Post Post #986  (isolation #18)  » Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:56 am

You can make a much healthier lemon curd with stevia, less egg, and unsweetened high-whey/protein greek yogurt instead of butter. Use meyer lemons if you can.
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Post Post #990  (isolation #19)  » Mon Mar 11, 2013 12:57 pm

In post 988, zoraster wrote:I think they're a cross between an orange and a lemon, so they're sweeter than a typical lemon. Quite tasty, but I don't see them around nearly as much as I did when I was in LA. Anyway, I don't know that meyer lemon would be any healthier.


The cultivar interacts with stevia better imo, but it's a subjective thing
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Post Post #1025  (isolation #20)  » Mon Mar 18, 2013 4:00 pm

Made a spicy chile & sweet dried plum glaze w/ sparkling plum sake for salmon, and it was delicious. I think any number of sweet & tangy or sweet & spicy sauces could be used for fishes.
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Post Post #1083  (isolation #21)  » Fri Mar 29, 2013 11:21 pm

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Post Post #1164  (isolation #22)  » Mon Jun 10, 2013 12:00 pm

I'm making pizza tonight probs!
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